Understanding Terms

<p>I've never spoken to an admissions counselor, never had high school teachers discuss college with me, (correspondence study) and I have no idea what half of the terms I'm reading are! I've made it this far, I've picked a major, a degree, and a college that accepts my source of a high school diploma. I'm trying the best I can not to sound like a chicken with it's head cut off, so please humor me.
If an undergraduate is a student who has graduated high school (or achieved a G.E.D.) and is enrolled into a college working toward a degree, then what is an undergraduate school? On that note, what's a graduate school? What's the difference between college and graduate school? Can you go strait from high school into a graduate school? If I do not go strait from high school to graduate school, then what do I do? I would assume I complete the colleges Core Curriculum with the topic of the Master's degree selected as my major, is this correct?
I'm attempting to obtain a Master's degree from the college of my choice, but I'm confused on many levels. The college has a Graduate School of Agriculture and Animal Science which offers the Master's degree, so where do I enroll? Into the actual college? Into the graduate school? Are requirements for a Graduate school within a college different then the requirements of the actual college? I am sorry if I really sound lost, but I am. Thank you, for any assistance you can provide.</p>

<p>You have to go to undergrad school - college- before enrolling in graduate school. They're levels of education:</p>

<p>High school - diploma
College (undergraduate school) - bachelor's degree
Graduate school - which could be a masters program (2 years usually i believe), law school (4 years), med school (4 years - m.d.), dental school, etc etc.</p>

<p>If an undergraduate is a student who has graduated high school (or achieved a G.E.D.) and is enrolled into a college working toward a degree, then what is an undergraduate school? </p>

<p>An undergraduate is anyone who has not received a bachelors degree.</p>

<p>The undergraduate school is either a 2 year school where you would achieve an associates degree then go on to a 4 year school where you would recieve a bachelors degree. Or you can go to a 4 year school and recieve a bachelors degree upon completion of your courses.</p>

<p>On that note, what's a graduate school? </p>

<p>A person attends graduate school when they want to get a degree above a bachelors, Masters, Doctorate.</p>

<p>What's the difference between college and graduate school? </p>

<p>Most colleges offer only bachelors degrees. some schools have limited Masters programs. Universities , which are larger than colleges or are comprised of differnt "schools" usually offer graduate degrees.</p>

<p>Can you go strait from high school into a graduate school? </p>

<p>No,</p>

<p>If I do not go strait from high school to graduate school, then what do I do? </p>

<p>You go to college or university and complete a bachelors degree.</p>

<p>I would assume I complete the colleges Core Curriculum with the topic of the Master's degree selected as my major, is this correct?</p>

<p>Don't put hte cart before the horse. Get the bachelors first, then worry about the masters, because depending on the program you will have to take GRE/GMAT exams and have a mininum number of credits to obtain the degree.</p>

<p>The college has a Graduate School of Agriculture and Animal Science which offers the Master's degree, so where do I enroll? </p>

<p>You apply to and if accepted enroll in an undergraduate degree program.</p>

<p>The graduate program with in the college is different from the actual college. Yes, people do get admitted in to a college complete a bachelors program , apply to an get rejected from the graduate program in that same college.</p>

<p>Okay, so far so good. Now, graduate school is a college of my chosen university, or at least I hope I'm getting this right. So, the college offers a course of study leading to a Bachelors degree in Animal Science, and a Master's degree in the same program. I would enroll in the university, take the course of study and achieve a Bachelor's degree, and from there take the GRE (in this case, it is required) and apply to the graduate school to continue onto the Master's degree. Assuming I have all of this correct, wherein does the universities Core Curriculum play a part? I'm under the impression it's required to be completed to achieve a bachelor's degree.</p>

<p>If the school has a core curriculum, it is probably courses that are required for completion of the undergraduate (bachelors degree)</p>

<p>Some graduate programs also have core curriculums. could you tell us the name of the shcool which you are considering?</p>

<p>After high school, there is: </p>

<p>College -- what you do first after high school, typically four years to get awarded a degree called a bachelors of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS), or bachelor of fine arts (BFA); during that time you are commonly referred to as an "undergrad" in an "undergraduate" program which is simply a reference to the fact that you have not graduated college yet.</p>

<p>Graduate school: what you can do after college and get a Master's degree (usually takes one to two years) or a Ph.D (anywhere from three to five years); you could even get a master's first and then go for a Ph.D. There are also two main professional graduate programs -- law school (and get a Juris Doctor, JD) and you go for usually three years, or medical school (and get an MD, Doctor of Medicine) which is usually four years with specialties adding several more. Majority of graduate schools are part of the same universities that have undergrad college programs.</p>

<p>Core curriculum: a general reference to a group of courses you need to qualify for any particular degree; you will find core curriculums in both college and graduate school (go to any college site; then go to its academics page, then go to any major you may want to look at and most likely you will reach a page that will tell courses that are necessary to get a degree). Also used to refer to core courses you need to take in high school in math, English, social studies, foreign language, and science, in order to be accepted at a college. In other words, it is a term used to describe a number of things.</p>

<p>What you describe -- go to college and get a bachelors degree, take the GRE which is required for admission to grad school, and then go to grad school -- is the way it generally works, but there are complications: to get into graduate school you have to be accepted by the grad school and that requires having done very well in college and on the GRE.</p>

<p>Because I live in Nevada and most of my family is here, I'll most likely goto UNR (University of Nevada Reno). UNR offers as high as a Master's degree in Animal Science. I have also looked a lot into U.C. Davis, which also offers this degree.</p>

<p>This is UNR's prospective student page:
<a href="http://www.unr.edu/content/prospective.asp#27%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.unr.edu/content/prospective.asp#27&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>This is U.C. Davis' student page:
<a href="http://caes.ucdavis.edu/%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://caes.ucdavis.edu/&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>