URM SAT scores.

<p>What would a breakdown of SAT scores for admittance to Harvard be?</p>

<p>NA
AA
etc.</p>

<p>Your question is a straw man. No single set of stats indicates Yes/No for any candidate.</p>

<p>I suppose I meant more of an average SAT score for admitted URMs, if anyone happens to know this.</p>

<p>Sent from my DROIDX using CC App</p>

<p>Averages broken down in that fashion are considered proprietary information, and you aren't likely to find them available anywhere. There has been some research done in the area, however and the best estimate available comes to about 350 points for Black students and 270 points for Hispanics, on a 2400 point scale. Applying that to the average admissions stats Harvard reported for the overall student body, 2230, and you come to an average SAT total in the neighborhood of the mid 1800's to high 1900's. There are more then a few problems with this analysis, but that is probably a reasonably accurate ballpark number.</p>

<p>For what it's worth, back in '93 Harvard released a report that broke out the numbers by race in response to a DOE investigation. The SAT was 1600 points at that time, of course. The class of '95 had an overall avg of 1390. Asians 1450, Whites 1400, Hispanics 1310, Blacks 1290.</p>

<p>Of course Harvard admitted 18% of applicants back then, so quite a bit has changed over the past 18 years.</p>

<p>Interesting.. any idea what the average for Native Americans or Hawaiians is?</p>

<p>Sent from my DROIDX using CC App</p>

<p>There is an African American girl who got a likely letter from Harvard yesterday. Her breakdown reads something like this:</p>

<p>2300 SAT</p>

<p>9 5s in AP tests - National AP scholar</p>

<p>Two SAT II scores of 800 and two more around 750</p>

<p>Doing a full load of IB</p>

<p>Already admitted to Chicago EA.</p>

<p>I don't see these numbers being very advantageous for an URM. It just means you have a better probability of being chosen.</p>

<p>^ Such stats would not warrant a likely letter without URM status.</p>

<p>^ may be the case but I don't see too many non-URMs doing much better statswise who get in.</p>

<p>Just showing OP that being URM does not get you in with lower numbers.</p>

<p>"stats" are hardly ever what warrant likely letters. What more people on this board need to realize is that college admissions is highly subjective. An uninteresting person with killer stats has near a near zero chance at any top-tier college. An interesting person (displays sense of humor, love of learning, etc.) with a 2150 will probably be given that spot in a heartbeat.</p>

<p>"Such stats would not warrant a likely letter without URM status"</p>

<p>Maybe not but the fact that this individual will be courted heavily by every school she applies would lead any rational Harvard admissions officer to "put a hat into the ring" to stave off the other colleges. Harvard wants this woman to be a freshman -- to be among the other incoming Harvard freshman. What's wrong with that? Should Harvard sit on its laurels (We are Hah-vahd!) idly while someone snatches her away?</p>

<p>Geez. For me: good job for Harvard.</p>

<p>I don't see any evidence of top colleges admitting jokers with 2150 scores.</p>

<p>I'm not exactly sure if responding to this argument is a good use of my time, but I'd like to point out that that is a terrible paraphrase of my previous post. </p>

<p>The point of my post must have been lost in translation from my mind to the screen to your mind. (I recognize that that previous sentence might sound sarcastic, and assure you it is not.)</p>

<p>I admit I took the liberty of defining someone with a sense of humor being a joker.</p>

<p>Let me give you some examples if you believe in what you said to point out why not:</p>

<p>Princeton published the stats for 2015 admittees.</p>

<p>They list anyone scoring between 2300 -2400 as having a 20% admit rate. Anyone below 2300 has the probability of admission much closer to the overall admit rate of 8.5%</p>

<p>Brown shows that someone with a perfect ACT score has a 33% admit rate.</p>

<p>"An interesting person (displays sense of humor, love of learning, etc.) with a 2150 will probably be given that spot in a heartbeat. "</p>

<p>I don't know of any top 20 schools that admit based on the above statement (may be Chicago). They are all looking for excellence in every area but may give you some leeway on your scores if they see some specific area of excellence in you that meets their needs. Interesting person meets that need if you can throw a football 60 yards downfield within 1 inch of a dot or you won a national award in literature or science or something else. Stanford said the interesting people last year were a world class tap dancer and nation's best shooter of some kind.</p>

<p>
[quote]
An uninteresting person with killer stats has near a near zero chance at any top-tier college. An interesting person (displays sense of humor, love of learning, etc.) with a 2150 will probably be given that spot in a heartbeat.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I would replace "sense of humor" with "demonstrated leadership in ECs etc" and I don't know the SAT percentiles offhand but for the most part this comment is correct. It's not so much that a 2380 is equal to a 2150, but once your score crosses a certain threshold the points become less and less meaningful relative to subjectives. 2380 is still better than 2150 but the difference isn't as impressive as a solid EC.</p>

<p>^ an articulate explanation of my intent.
What I was trying to say, at the most basic level, was that using your essays to brag about achievements in a very obvious way instead of trying to show the admissions committees your personality through them is not a very good strategy.</p>

<p>Of all the full applications that I've ever read (which I admit, isn't many [~10]) I can tell you exactly why or why not the person got in. Sometimes (not many) it has to do with scores. But most of the time, the essay is severely lacking.</p>

<p>Take all of this as you will.</p>

<p>""Such stats would not warrant a likely letter without URM status"</p>

<p>Maybe not but the fact that this individual will be courted heavily by every school she applies would lead any rational Harvard admissions officer to "put a hat into the ring" to stave off the other colleges. Harvard wants this woman to be a freshman -- to be among the other incoming Harvard freshman. What's wrong with that? Should Harvard sit on its laurels (We are Hah-vahd!) idly while someone snatches her away?</p>

<p>Geez. For me: good job for Harvard."</p>

<p>Sorry for the crude quoting, I don't know how things work here.
Thanks for saying that T26E4, that was really nice!</p>

<p>Oh not the quote within the quote though. Naturally, I tend to disagree with statements like that. I totally understand that my URM status may certainly have been a factor in my admission, because of the whole "holistic evaluation" idea, but I don't think it was definitive of why I was admitted!</p>