War medals shouldn't be given to soldiers

<p>agree or disagree?</p>

<p>i personally agree. if i were fighting in a war in defense of my country, i wouldn't need a purple heart or any other award to validate my cause or to make me feel better about myself. imho, medals earned in combat are purely for self-aggrandizement. also, when i come home after my service, i'm not gonna walk around in public wearing a decorated uniform (the decorated officers in reagan's funeral really annoyed me). that's just a show off tactic and is just plain cheesy and unnecessary.</p>

<p>I think that the men and women who serve their country in combat deserve any and all recognition that is bestowed upon them. It really is a sacrifice. </p>

<p>One of the greatest wrongs of my generation was punishing the servicemen for fighting in an unpopular war. I'm glad to see the soldiers returning from the Middle East get the thanks they deserve from those of us lucky enough to sit at home and be protected by their efforts. They can "show off" all they want; spend a year in some godforsaken desert getting shot at and I'd say you've earned it!</p>

<p>but wouldn't the satisfaction already come from knowing that you risked your life to protect your country? do you need the medal so others would know that you're a hero? if so, isn't that a form of self-aggrandizement? and according to you, this is ok. would you feel better about the soldier who stays humble about his service or the soldier who constantly brags about his heroic feats? in all honesty, i see people walking in the streets wearing their uniform with a million decorations on it. i feel inclined to say get over yourself! i certainly wouldn't do that if i were to become a war veteran.</p>

<p>I don't think many combat soldiers brag about their heroic feats.</p>

<p>I am not a veteran. Saigon fell months before my 18th birthday. One of my uncles lost an arm and 3 fingers at the Battle of the Bulge. Another lost most of their intestines in the Ardennes. My wife's uncle was a POW in the Phillipines who escaped and led a guerilla campaign against the Japanese for three years. Her cousin was a Medal of Honor winner in Vietnam. My father won a Bronze Star, and an Oak Leaf cluster at Phu Cat in Vietnam in 1968. One of my best friends was a Green Beret in the Mekong in 67 and again in 69. Not one of these men glorified war. Not one of these men felt anything but disappointment in mankind for failing to avoid war. Not one has ever talked to me about killing.</p>

<p>My daughter marches in her school's band, a uniformed military style precision marching band. Within the week they will march on Veteran's Day within a mile from one of the largest Veteran's Hospitals in the country. One that specializes in the psychiatric problems of wartime veterans. One threatened by closure for budgetary reasons. The hospital where my Dad spent some time. Many of those hospital residents will be in attendance. At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month the band will file smartly past heroes. Some of whom need our respect. All of whom deserve it. Most all of the soldiers, sailors, and airmen will wipe a tear or two of remembrance from their eyes. Some will be sobbing. A few always do. Not one will be crying about themselves.</p>

<p>After the performance the students will make a small presentation at our too small local memorial to those that didn't return from foreign wars.The rest of their too short time will be spent talking to the veterans.The veterans will heap praise on the high school kids for remembering them with this two hours of one school-day's time. Some of the veterans will be wearing their medals. Not one will be seeking glory or aggrandizement. Some of the band members will cry on the bus back to school. A few always do. Not one will be crying about themselves.</p>

<p>Angry, do yourself a favor. Find a local veteran's hospital and volunteer some time there. You may be surprised at what you learn about medals and the men and women who wear them. For me, as always I'll be in the audience to support my daughter's performance but on this one day my right hand will be in my pocket, just like last year, rubbing a star and a ribbon. I miss you, Dad.</p>

<p>Curmudgeon: Great post.
Angryschnauzer: Are you a student? Will you refrain from listing your prizes, awards and other honors on your application? Take Curmudegon's advice. Better still, enlist in the army and come back after your tour of duty and let us know what you plan on doing with your medals then--assuming that you won any.
In the meantime, in honor of Armistice Day, read Wilfred Owen's War Poems.</p>

<p>This is a good subject. I don't know the answer. Some people like the recognition, others feel it diminishes their service. I suppose it depends on the person.</p>

<p>"I don't think many combat soldiers brag about their heroic feats."</p>

<p>they don't
the ones I know don't even want to talk about it</p>

<p>Plus I have a fanastic guy in my company who had the honor to carry his casket, a prior honor guard member in the coast guard. Angry you are a sad soul.</p>

<p>~Emily~</p>

<p>Yesterday being the Saturday before Veterans' Day, a group of Jewish War Veterans joined us at our synagogue for the morning service. I have rarely been so moved as when they all stood to be recognized during our Prayer for Peace.</p>

<p>"Angryschnauzer: Are you a student? Will you refrain from listing your prizes, awards and other honors on your application? Take Curmudegon's advice. Better still, enlist in the army and come back after your tour of duty and let us know what you plan on doing with your medals then--assuming that you won any.
In the meantime, in honor of Armistice Day, read Wilfred Owen's War Poems."</p>

<p>war is public service in defense of your country. academic prizes, awards, and honors are only for personal achievement.</p>

<p>WTF medals are meant to honor the sacrifice and courage of servicemen who put their lives on the line, and go above and beyond the call of duty.</p>

<p>I see NOTHING wrong with giving them out.</p>

<p>curmudgeon...wow...that was amazingly written and beautifully put. thank you for sharing your experience with this issue, i know i came away from your post wiser than i was before i read it. i'm so very sorry that your family members suffered becuase of these wars, but i also want to say thank you to any man or woman who is brave enough to fight for their country and their beleifs, willing to risk their very lives for it. They deserve any small token of gratitude we can offer.
even if we dont support the war, we HAVE to support the soldiers fighting in it.</p>

<p>you must be kidding me. what the hell is wrong with giving out medals. maybe we should get rid of every single award then. i mean nobel peace prize winners should really just be content with the fact that they helped out, huh. you f-ing tard, get a life.</p>

<p>and by the way, you're, in fact, not fighting for our country. so shut up and maybe i'll respect your opinion when you actually do turn down a medal in honor for your country.</p>

<p>
[quote]
agree or disagree?</p>

<p>i personally agree. if i were fighting in a war in defense of my country, i wouldn't need a purple heart or any other award to validate my cause or to make me feel better about myself. imho, medals earned in combat are purely for self-aggrandizement.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>What a dumbnut. Medals aren't issued to VALIDATE your service. They are issued to HONOR your service. Besides, soldiers who serves honorably and has recieved a medal do NOT show them off merely for self-aggrandizement. (some military posers do, but that is an entirely different story) Where in the world did you get this idea.</p>

<p>The only medal I have is my national defense medal and ribbon. It's mandatory to wear our ribbon with our winter working blues uniform. I personally don't feel like I deserve it because I feel like I haven't "served" yet. But we have to wear it, uniform dress code wise.</p>

<p>I did not read Angry's post the way some of you did. What I read was not someone denigrating a soldier's service. I read that Angry had a problem with the medals being displayed publicly, even on the dress uniforms of pallbearers in a state funeral. Something didn't strike Angry right about the medals being worn, not the service for which the medals were given. Almost a "Shaker" attitude of an unneccessary adornment that cheapens the wearer, or even that it trivializes the conduct that was rewarded with the medal. Angry even said "when I serve....". Sadly, where our country is at this moment in time might confuse someone about the motives one would have in wearing war time medals.Speaking only about the men I talked about in my first post, none of them were or are remotely "political" . To be rather blunt, wearing a medal for commercial or political reasons would be a good way to get your a%$ kicked around my dad . It really wouldn't have been a good idea around any of them, come to think of it. </p>

<p>My measured response on an issue that is close to where I live was intended to explain to Angry that ordinary marines, soldiers, sailors, and airmen don't have any thoughts of self aggrandizement or self-promotion. When a combat veteran puts on their medals they are thinking of their buddies they served with when the call came . They are thinking about the buddies that didn't make it back, or all to often -all the way back. Had I thought Angry's post was otherwise I would have responded as some of you have, except I would have been brutal in light of Angry's unfortunate timing. This week , if possible, let's all try to spend a moment or two contemplating the sacrifices of ordinary men and women , often poor and under-educated, quite often rural or from blighted urban areas and disproportionately minority, and always young when they left home.</p>

<p>Lord if they earned those medals, they have every right to wear them on their dress uniforms. </p>

<p>Please explain how this "trivializes" the service or how it involves commericalization or politics.</p>

<p>Good God, I don't believe that it trivializes or commercializes anything! Read it again. This time more slowly, please. And USNA-Reject I was going to add a P.S. that the soldiers on Reagan's Funeral Detail were required to wear the medals. I have been to more military funerals than I care to count. I thought your point had already been made . That is why I didn't post the postscript. I was trying to point out that Angry was misinformed and ignorant of veterans, not hostile to them as some of you felt. I went on to say that if I thought Angry was being disrepectful instead of ignorant , I would have been far more harsh than either of you two you had been. Got it?</p>

<p>I guess none of you understood my previous post, when you wear the dress uniform you HAVE to wear the ribbons and medals you earned on certain occassons. I went to the Navy Birthday Ball last month and some of us Napsters realized we were the only ones not wearing our medal. The officers were loaded and it shows seniority. Like half of you know what some of the medals stand for anyways. "PURPLE HEART PURPLE HEART PURPLE HEART!"
If I spoke to a brick wall I think it would listen better.</p>