Was Harvard worth it?

<p>I am interested in hearing from alums who worked hard to get into their dream school.
Was it ultimately worth it and did it live up to your expecations and if so how and if not why was it a let down?</p>

<p>GH, this is an interesting question and I look forward to hearing the responses to it, but I'd suggest that in order to put those responses in some context you pose the same question on the boards of a non-Ivy, a liberal arts college, and your in-state flagship. I think that most people develop an attachment to their college, and most people only have no way to compare the experience at one college to another.</p>

<p>If I had idolized Harvard, which "dream school" often implies, it would not now be worth it. No college can live up to that kind of "OMG it will be PERFECT" pressure. Every college has flaws. But yes, I did work hard to get here, and yes it was worth what sacrifices I made in high school. (Still have two and a half more years here, though, so I can't speak with the clarity of hindsight.)</p>

<p>I wanted to go here since about 5th grade. I finalized my decision in 8th grade. I figured out that I'd be able to afford it in 11th grade, and that was finalized when I got my financial aid letter.</p>

<p>I can't imagine being happier at a university. This is perfect for me. It has the right climate, the right mix of town and city, a great mix of easy classes and impossible classes (meaning that I have the opportunity to make my life as hellish as I wish, for example by competing in mathematics either with people who've stopped caring or with Evan O'Dorney), professors who're both great lecturers and leaders in their fields of specialty, a multitude of highly intelligent people to argue with about politics... It's a dream come true. </p>

<p>In short, it was worth it-- though if you don't enjoy what you have to do to get here (academics, competition, community involvement) you may not end up feeling as I do.</p>

<p>Not an alum yet, but I don't think I've made any sacrifice or worked hard just to get in here. It didn't occur to me to apply until the very end of my junior year, with the encouragement of all the college mailings. Yet, starting from an unexpected acceptance letter, Harvard had everything to give in return, from the full financial aid to the intellectually stimulating classes to wonderful community. I don't know what kind of crazy expectation people have out there for a school, but I'm very happy having chosen to come here and certainly have a deep attachment to the campus.</p>

<p>Current student here. Pretty happy with it overall but I'm sure I would have been happy at other colleges too. It's not a fairy tale but it's certainly worth putting in the work.</p>

<p>OMG. So worth it.</p>

<p>For my kid: Wharton would have been far better option in terms of job recruitment. But in the end Harvard was very good option as major buy side firm only recruits at Wharton and Harvard. Kid just have to work much harder to get into major buy side fund as they do not teach finance in Harvard. One has to self learn it. Harvard is still a very good option. My second kid chose Wharton over Harvard.</p>

<p>
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omg. So worth it.

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<p>:) !</p>

<p>@collegeinusa finance and even more so MBA's are not heavily considered for any finance job. Even worse, MBA's are neutral to NEGATIVE for any kind of management job. The majority of executives hold a strong belief of this, including Warren Buffett, Guy Kawasaki and Lloyd Blankfield.</p>

<p>GTG:</p>

<p>If you are politically savy, you do not need to go to HYPWMS at all. One can make plenty of money by doing inside trading while in Congress. </p>

<p>Congress:</a> Trading stock on inside information? - CBS News</p>

<p>GordonTheGekko wrote:
[quote]
@collegeinusa finance and even more so MBA's are not heavily considered for any finance job. Even worse, MBA's are neutral to NEGATIVE for any kind of management job. The majority of executives hold a strong belief of this, including Warren Buffett, Guy Kawasaki and Lloyd Blankfield.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Were all these assertions true, it would be a terrible mistake for anyone to get an MBA. It's true that there are lively debates about the value of an MBA, but it's also true that there are a lot of MBA's on Wall Street, and, on average, grads find that their MBA made their career prospects and lifetime income stream better, often a lot better, not worse. If GordonTheGekko has evidence to the contrary, I hope he'll share it.</p>

<p>collegeinusa: i lol'd</p>