What courses do you recommend taking at a CC?

<p>I read on here that calculus is extremely difficult at UT, are chem or physics classes also very hard?</p>

<p>What classes are better to take at a CC?</p>

<p>Foreign languages.</p>

<p>The physics department at UT has to be the worst, take it somewhere else if you can!</p>

<p>A friend of mine always complained about the physics lab for General Physics I. She said the math in the lab was more difficult than in the lecture and that only a percentage of the class could get an A.</p>

<p>Government 310. Not really a difficulty related suggestion, more of a practical one. </p>

<p>Most sections are extremely easy, multiple choice tests, etc, but I think it's better taking it online or at a CC, so you don't have to waste the time in class. Plus it's cheaper to take it somewhere else. </p>

<p>You can take 312 outside of UT as well, but since 312 has a good selection of topics, I would suggest looking into taking it at UT if you are interested in any of the topics.</p>

<p>if i get accepted to UT, can i take phys and calc at a CC in the summer of my senior year? Or will UT not let me?</p>

<p>^ ya im also curious about that</p>

<p>You will be able to take classes at CC and transfer it over. However, you might want to check with UT to verify the equivalent course number at the CC. Or else, it will not count towards your degree and/or transfer.</p>

<p>As far as taking calculus or physics in CC, it depends on where do you think you can learn the best and not whether you can make an A. Some CC has great teachers, some don't. At UT, you need to be used to the lecture, self-study model to really learn the concepts. But the lecture, self-study model is what you are going to need to adapt to if you want to succeed for the higher level course with no CC equivalents. </p>

<p>I took both calculus and physics at UT. I have to admit, my high school teacher would have done a better job, and I probably would have learned the concepts a bit better. However, in those classes, I adapted to a new learning style, which is essential to my success in subsequent classes.</p>

<p>I took calculus both in high school and at UT and the UT professors are absolutely horrendous (I tried 2 professors). My high school teacher taught everything extremely well, making it very easy to understand, while staying concise. It's pretty disappoint how horrible some of the UT professors are...</p>

<p>how many hours can u transfer from a CC if you are already enrolled as a UT student? Basically is there a limit on the number of hours you can take at a CC once you are enrolled as a UT student?</p>

<p>It depends on the college and your major. You just need to make sure that at least 60 credit hours of your degree are done at UT and then in the last 30 hours of your degree, you are only allowed to transfer 6 credits. I am not so sure how this works if you are double majoring, though. </p>

<p>And I would take Calculus at CC if I didn't need the higher level stuff. Otherwise you might screw yourself over by taking one calculus at a CC and then trying to take the next level at UT.</p>

<p>Also, you can always take the physics sat subject test to get a lot of physics credit if your major allows it.</p>

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And I would take Calculus at CC if I didn't need the higher level stuff. Otherwise you might screw yourself over by taking one calculus at a CC and then trying to take the next level at UT.

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<p>Do you know if community colleges offer M408C or M408D?? If they only offer the lower level one would you not recommend taking it?</p>

<p>I'm thinking that doing the courses at ACC (Austin Community College) or some other CC would suffice. You should probably call UT and ask them what the equivalent courses are at the CC you're planning to take them at.</p>

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Do you know if community colleges offer M408C or M408D?? If they only offer the lower level one would you not recommend taking it?

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<p>I haven't heard of any CC offering 408C and D. Most, like ACC, offer the K,L,M sequence instead. It is the same material but in three semesters instead of two. I understand the argument about not taking something easy if you will need higher courses afterward. However, calculus at UT is done rather poorly. If you get a good professor and make sure you really know the material, I think you would be fine.</p>

<p>Calculus isn't hard at UT if your willing to learn (K,L,M and C are joke/really easy, D however is totally a different case)... I suggest taking E 316K at CC if you dont have credit for it</p>

<p>Sorry but I'm gonna bump this. So I plan on taking my physics and calculus requirements at a CC sometime over the next 4 years, are there any other classes yall would recommend?</p>

<p>We have heard it is a very good idea to take one or both of the Texas-required US history requirements at a CC, if you do not come in with APUSH credit. You will need two 3-credit US history classes to graduate due to a Texas law. If you can take one or both of these at a cc, you avoid having to take these at UT. These classes are not known to be easy A's and could bring down your GPA.</p>

<p>(My D took "American Studies" for one of her two Texas required US History classes and she liked it; you don't HAVE to take "US history to 1877" and "US History after 1877" as your two classes, although many people do.)</p>

<p>If you decide to try history credits at a community college, try Kramer at ACC. He kicks @$$ as a professor. It isn't too hard but the lectures are spellbinding.</p>

<p>thanks midwestmom2kids and fiyero! thats exactly the info i need</p>

<p>this is helpful
UT</a> Austin Automated Transfer Equivalency System</p>