"What do Yale students and Harvard students have in common?"

<p>They both got into Yale. :D</p>

<p>and you know what all Harvard students have in common?</p>

<p>They secretly wish they went to Yale.</p>

<p>not so secretly:</p>

<p><a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/magazine.aspx?issdat=11/20/2003%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/magazine.aspx?issdat=11/20/2003&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>84.3% ocachoy!</p>

<p>84.3 % are unhappy
<a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=506807%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=506807&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Zogoto-falser words have never been spoken.</p>

<p>Prepster - I don't know that the Iraqi Minister of Information is quite ready to have that title taken from him by our friend Zogoto.</p>

<p>"Harvard ... does not have to worry about yield concerns and about its common admits choosing other schools—according to admissions officials, Harvard generally wins 75 percent of common admits between it and Yale. 'Harvard is the elephant in the restaurant. They sit wherever they want...' Even without a binding program, Harvard typically has the highest yield rate of any university, which was about 80 percent for the Class of 2006."</p>

<p><a href="http://www.yaleherald.com/article.php?Article=1467%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.yaleherald.com/article.php?Article=1467&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>But then again, Harvard students are quick to acknowledge Yale's superiority in certain areas.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=255288%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=255288&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Why dont we just answer the dagone question-What do they have in common? A love of learning. Amazing talent and intelligence. Someone, anyone, pray continue.</p>

<p>Oh, and Byerly, Mr Podolsy didnt account for the fact that, um, YALE UNIVERSITY IS LESS THAN HALF THE SIZE OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY.</p>

<p>Less than half, eh?</p>

<p>1,640 freshmen vs 1,325 freshmen?</p>

<p>6,600 undergrads vs 5,400 undergrads?</p>

<p>18,800 total FTE students, including grad and professional schools, vs 11,400?</p>

<p>Although perhaps I am mistaken ... perhaps you were thinking of endowment, not students, where the ratio is indeed closer to 2:1,</p>

<p>Oh, and last year, Harvard enrolled 312 National Merit scholars, while yale enrolled 224. In other words, 21% of Harvard's class of 2008 were National merit scholars while (tear) 19% of yale's class were. Thats a wopping difference of, um, 2 percent!</p>

<p>If you look at FTE students, Yale is about 60% the size. It is still considerably smaller than Harvard.</p>

<p>Oh, sorry, I stand corrected-I mistakenly thought Harvard's class was 1,500. Harvard and Yale have the same percentage of National Merit Scholars in the class of 2008-19 percent!</p>

<p>Oh, and Harvard is roughly 75 percent larger than Yale, while its endowment is roughly 80 percent larger than Yale's.</p>

<p>Great post zogoto. Truly humorous!</p>

<p>... and it gets roughly 75-80% of the common admits, I guess.</p>

<p>I hope, inuendo, that you are being facetious.</p>

<p>Yay for Harvard, Byerly. As if you havent already beaten us over the head with that statistic-which is dated and has no clearly identifiable source.</p>

<p>"Harvard generally wins 75 percent of common admits between it and Yale. "Harvard is the elephant in the restaurant. They sit wherever they want..." Even without a binding program, Harvard typically has the highest yield rate of any university, which was about 80 percent for the Class of 2006."</p>

<p><a href="http://www.yaleherald.com/article.php?Article=1467%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.yaleherald.com/article.php?Article=1467&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>"Three out of every four students that are admitted to both institutions choose Harvard"</p>

<p><a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=255288%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=255288&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>"According to Leverett Professor of Mathematics Benedict H. Gross, who also serves on the admissions committee, more than three-quarters of students who are accepted at Harvard and one of its top three competitors (Yale, Princeton and Stanford) come to Harvard."</p>

<p><a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=214992%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=214992&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>"The only reason Harvard stays competitive (in athletics), according to Westerfield, is that it’s Harvard. Three out of four students who get into Harvard and either Yale or Princeton choose Harvard, and it’s no different with high-scoring athletes. “Typically, if I want a kid, I get him,” Westerfield says. “I didn’t lose any kids last year. "</p>

<p><a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=349217%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=349217&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>