What do you think HSers should know about college?

<p>Since HS and college and usually two different experiences, is there anything that HSers should know before they embark on complete independence?</p>

<p>dont waste your time on ECs. Get a job and make money. Especially if you dont want to transfer out.</p>

<p>Don't be afraid to commute. Everyone tells you "OMG its teh pits!!! You'll make no friends!! u have to go d0rm!!!!!" when that's actually not the case.</p>

<p>It is exactly like Animal House...</p>

<p>yeah, exactly...</p>

<p>Sorry, even if I was trying to be serious, I couldn't help you, I'm not really having a "traditional" experience.</p>

<p>I disagree with greenvison (if what they mean is don't waste time on ECs in college) because some of my best experiences are from what I did in my organizations. I also disagree with Vail because I commuted during the summer after freshman year (I'm 40ish minutes away from home at my school, but dormed freshman and sophomore year) and that summer was total hell and I hated it. I think living away from my mom allowed her to realize that I was now an adult and it gave me the freedom I needed. We actually get along alot better now that we don't live together. </p>

<p>My personal advice would be to explore what's out there. Get involved in something that interests you, DONT PROCRASTINATE ON SCHOOL STUFF, live on your own away from parents if you can, and there's nothing wrong with you if you don't have 8 new best friends within the first two weeks of school. I met many of my really good friends about two months before school ended freshman year. And I still am meeting new people as a junior, in classes, through other friends, etc.</p>

<p>Try a lot of new stuff. Don't commit to one activity or one major too early, college is when you have the time to figure out what you want to do and be. Don't be afraid to change your major - an extra semester or year at school, while perhaps expensive, is better than 40 years in a job you have no passion for.</p>

<p>Booze, broads, and blunts.</p>

<p>That's what HSers think about college. Silly them.</p>

<p>nobody cares about what you did in high school and if you were on the football team or went to totally sick parties at matt's house on the weekends, if you peaked in high school that's a shame but nobody wants to hear you reliving it</p>

<p>"I also disagree with Vail because I commuted during the summer after freshman year (I'm 40ish minutes away from home at my school, but dormed freshman and sophomore year) and that summer was total hell and I hated it. I think living away from my mom allowed her to realize that I was now an adult and it gave me the freedom I needed. We actually get along alot better now that we don't live together."</p>

<p>Not every mother/child relationship dynamic is like yours, not every family lives forty minutes from school their kid's school, and at many schools, living at home is not the only alternative when one opts out of the dorm.</p>

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Not every mother/child relationship dynamic is like yours, not every family lives forty minutes from school their kid's school, and at many schools, living at home is not the only alternative when one opts out of the dorm.

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<p>Thanks dntw8up, much appreciated.</p>

<p>College you have a lot more free time than in high school. You can spend it doing homework, partying, joining clubs, working out, studying, watching TV, banging some chick, or playing video games. The biggest difference is that time management is MUCH MORE important than in high school, and you generally don't have someone guiding you along.</p>

<p>Erhswimming brings up a good point. Learn the fine art of multitasking - for example, ask your girl if she doesn't mind a little Madden while you're getting freaky. I can finish at least two games in time for the post-coital cuddling, and sometimes even squeeze in a club meeting. It just takes practice.</p>

<p>How long quarters do you play?</p>

<p>Five minutes.</p>

<p>I know that dorming is not the only option if one doesn't live at home, but living away from home was my point. I live in an apartment in my college's town right now; I don't really consider that commuting. I can walk to campus in 15-20 minutes. </p>

<p>I know that not everyone has the same relationship with their parents as I do with my mom, but many many people do. My mom used to be really overprotective and nosy, calling me 5 or 6 times a day for no reason. When I lived at home that summer, she treated me like I was still in high school and gave me a curfew after I had lived on my own for a whole year doing my own thing, so of course it was really frustrating. After not living with her, I find that my relationship with my mom is more loving and we fight much less. I'm sure many people's relationships with their parents would also benefit from such a situation as mine.</p>

<p>Get your school stuff done early on in the day so your evenings/weekends will be available for social time, in whatever form it may take for you. </p>

<p>Even if you don't like Halo or Guitar Hero, play once in a while so you can fit in a little bit.</p>

<p>In the first month, ask people two questions about themselves before you say anything about you. It makes friends quick.</p>

<p>The only reason i said not to waste time on other activities because you could achieve much much more by utilizing that time during work ( even if its normal office stuff for $7/hr). And studying is even better because a good GPA lands you in a good internship program( and that extra socializing(with utter strangers unlike socializing with friends) skills you get from working can be used to persuade the interviewer to hire you ) .</p>

<p>Fraternity? I have no comment, the members seem to enjoy allot, but i tend to stay away.</p>

<p>Join EC's. They're there, they're free (usually), they can teach you a lot, so why not take advantage of them?</p>

<p>Most colleges = party culture. If you were never into that stuff in HS, you'll probably be surprised (I was). Please don't get too sucked into it. Don't start thinking partying through college makes you cool and grades don't matter. It annoys me so much when I talk to people like that. </p>

<p>Develop some good habits. i.e. don't sleep at 5am everyday or eat junk food for meals or skip every class because you don't feel like going. It'll help you in college, and I'm sure it can't hurt when you leave college.</p>

<p>Meet new people, try new things, have some good experiences. And by experiences I don't just mean crazy drunken nights, have some decent, even sophisticated experiences too, ok?</p>

<p>The socialization, leadership, friendships, contacts and professional skills one can get from college ECs can serve you well for a lifetime no matter what field you go into. There's more to ECs than partying. There also are some ECs that can lead directly to excellent jobs. One example is that people who go into journalism or the media are usually expected to have had extensive student media experience in order to get internships, and one needs internships in those fields to get jobs.</p>

<p>Professions like medicine want to accept students who are service-minded, not just looking to enter a lucrative field. Consequently, extensive community service in college can boost one's applications for things such as medical school.</p>

<p>Schedule prep time for classes first. Do not get behind - you cannot catch up in one 24-hour period. Exercise until you break a sweat at least three times a week - consider six or seven times. Have one 24-hour period per week when you don't even think about studying - if you can work and make money during at least eight hours of that time - so much the better. I learned some of this by my junior year in college - all by the end of grad school. I would say the 24-hour no-study period was as important as scheduling prep time for classes. I agree with someone above that the work world - even if minimum wage - is part of your preparation for life and does develop social skills across socioeconomic groups that you will not develop in Greek life - although I do not denigrate being Greek.</p>