What Kind of Work is Available for Work Study?

<p>I want to know what kind of work you do with a work study program. I am aware that some schools make the students call prospective students (as I have received some calls from students), but I am not cut out for that kind of job. (I can't do phone calls comfortably; I need to be able to make eye contact to communicate) Now, do the jobs take time away from your studies a lot (planning Electrical Engineering and Computer Science double major; got in as EE to some schools so far) Are there jobs that better utilize my skills? Perhaps IT, or web development of the main site.</p>

<p>When you fill out your FAFSA it should tell you the maximum dollar amount you may be paid through work-study. Then you figure out how many hours a week that divides down to. Often it can range from 5 hours a week to 15 hours a week...I've never seen more than that, although I'm sure it can happen. But you are also not forced to work the full hours you are given - but that means you also won't get the full funding of work-study.</p>

<p>My school had a little "job fair" where different departments looking for work-study help would sit around and talk with students. Some options I am aware of: Working in admissions or financial aid doing filing and basic secretarial work; working in the cafeteria prepping or serving food; working in the library checking out books and searching for requested articles from other schools; working as a secretary assistant for your major department. There are many more options, and I'm sure larger schools have even more. </p>

<p>Most of the jobs require little or no skill or brains. But if you search and ask a lot of questions in an area you're interested in, they might find something for you, you never know. I chose to turn down my work-study due to the crappy offerings and it only came out to 6 hours a week, and I got a "real" job off campus working a lot more (and also getting paid more). </p>

<p>Oh, you can also be a tour guide, that's usually a good-paying position.</p>

<p>Google your schools' website for "work study"; many post information online. Like NovaLynx said most work study jobs require little thinking, but your school might offer higher skilled ones. Some professors at my school offer paid work study internships, although they're usually competitive and require interviews.</p>

<p>My school has a list of available jobs. They range from sitting at a desk to helping kids learn to read to volunteering at the Boys and Girls Club.</p>

<p>What I did was, I went through the list of office jobs, marked down the ones that I thought applied to me/were interesting and I called from that list. The first place I called said they only hired Education Majors. The second place I called was just like "Come over whenever you get to campus." I wasn't entirely sure that I had the job, but apparently I did. All I had to do was call and give them my schedule and I didn't have to apply for it or anything.</p>

<p>My job is to basically just help with whatever is needed around the office and if there isn't anything needed, then I can do homework, get on facebook, read, etc.</p>

<p>Most work-study jobs aren't that serious. It's a way of you earning money for school and building your resume, but it usually isn't extremely serious work.</p>

<p>Also, remember that just because you are determined to be eligible for work study, there is no requirement that you actually take the opportunity. If you're worried that working will be a problem for your grades and you don't need the cash, don't apply for any of the jobs on campus. But if you want to work and have specific skills such as IT background, there are probably positions available in that area.</p>

<p>^^ Unless you want it to be serious work. </p>

<p>I have had two work study jobs: one was working through America Reads (teaching immigrant kids to read) and I currently have one at a domestic violence shelter. The majority of people I know with work study jobs work in the caf or at a desk job, but those pay less. There are also opportunities to work with professors at some schools through work study (research, etc). You need to look through your school's website and I suggest trying to apply early.</p>

<p>Be careful of stradmom's advice. At many schools, if you don't use your work study money the first year, it is no longer awarded to you. Non work study jobs are usually harder to come by than work study jobs which could bite you if you decide later that you do want a job.</p>

<p>If your school's work study program is anything like my school's work study program you'll be lucky if there are any positions available. If you actually want a job you're going to have to be more flexible, or you might just have to accept that you'll have to look for jobs elsewhere. </p>

<p>In my experience work study seems to be a joke- jobs that pay next to nothing and that hardly have any hours to offer. Dozens- hundreds- of students fight for jobs at my school that pay $7/hour and give you less than 10 hours a week. </p>

<p>If you really need money I would suggest getting a part-time job off-campus. You'll be more likely to get more hours that way. If it's experience you're looking for then I would suggest for you to look for internships. </p>

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Are there jobs that better utilize my skills? Perhaps IT, or web development of the main site.

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<p>Go visit those departments and ask. You never know. Another good idea is to search the Career Services website for your school.</p>

<p>^^ Your minimum wage must be less there. It is $7.25 in PA, and that's what most work-study jobs start at. Tour guides are usually $8-9/hr. Tutors also usually make a little more than minimum.</p>

<p>I don't know why parents seem to think that working 5-10 hours a week is too much, unless you're overloading your course schedule every semester. This is why students have a rough time developing time management skills. They're only splitting time between study and play. Real life is not that easy.</p>

<p>Also - a lot of schools pay out only once a month rather than weekly or bi-weekly. It probably won't make a difference, but some people prefer more frequent pay-outs because they're easier to manage over shorter periods of time.</p>

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I don't know why parents seem to think that working 5-10 hours a week is too much, unless you're overloading your course schedule every semester. This is why students have a rough time developing time management skills. They're only splitting time between study and play. Real life is not that easy.

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<p>5-10 hours a week is NOTHING! 10 hours could be just one day's worth of work in the real world. I hear people complain about how they have to go work their two hour shift and I think, what are they going to do when they have full-time jobs?</p>

<p>There are people that think 5-10 hours of work a week is too much? o.O</p>

<p>Some schools do not guarantee they'll get you a work study job, even if it's part of your aid package. That's something you want to check, if you will need the money. Off-campus jobs are often not as flexible and you have to get there.</p>

<p>Cafeteria, library, dept assistant, reception desks, research, vol work, lifeguard, security escorts- all sorts of things. Friend's son answers phones in admisisons (which sounds like super experience.) I personally think the best jobs are where you can meet the most potential friends. I was a dorm reception person in grad school and I had it made. My kids do regular community service for a specific program and love it.</p>

<p>Just a previous comment made about if the student thought the work would be too much and didn't need the money...but work-study usually requires fewer hours than a regular part-time job, so I think that'd be a bit extreme to say someone can't handle work-study.</p>

<p>Personally I preferred off-campus part-time jobs because they paid better, had more flexible scheduling (at least in retail), discounts, and opportunities to advance. Work-study never appealed to me, even though I was offered it every year. I guess it's good for those who just want a little spending money and who don't have any bills since it is such a fixed amount you can earn.</p>

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Some schools do not guarantee they'll get you a work study job, even if it's part of your aid package. That's something you want to check, if you will need the money. Off-campus jobs are often not as flexible and you have to get there.

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<p>The same was at my school. They only had a few tables set out and a whole lot of students coming through. There were more opportunities at the little "job fair" that were not represented, but not everyone found jobs, and not everyone got the job they wanted. </p>

<p>I think off-campus jobs are more for upperclassmen who have a better handle on their time management, they have a car on campus, and want to work for more saving money. Although if you live in a city it might be possible to find work within walking distance. </p>

<p>Our food service was so desperate for workers that they would pay students more than the aid allowed by putting the extra hours on the school's tab once the financial aid was used up. I guess no one liked working in those positions.</p>

<p>Considering that the federal government pays much of the cost of paying for work study workers, I would think that colleges would want to maximize the number of jobs that are under work study. A college department or service would much rather have 1/2 of the cost of workers come out of their budget than have the full cost come out of their budget. However, many students don't like working in food services, which may be the default choice if you don't find something better.</p>