What makes us so "special"?

<p>Crows make tools
Crow</a> Makes Wire Hook to Get Food
Most of us have a variation in a gene that promotes pair bonding, as do voles,
and we aren't the only species who uses language for communication, so what makes us human?</p>

<p>What do we do that distinguishes ourselves from * other* animals?
Or are we the same, just different?</p>

<p>I saw a photo spread from some zoo where they were giving picture books to gorillas to keep them entertained and/or mentally stimulated. It does make you think.</p>

<p>I was disappointed that D1 didn't want to go to CWU to tour ( she applied and was accepted), when Washoe was addressing the students.
Central</a> Washington University : Washoe - Child of the CWU Community Dies
She died in 2007 at 42.</p>

<p>Koko, is probably better known.
The</a> Gorilla Foundation / Koko.org</p>

<p>Well, our opposable thumbs are really a big asset! And then the highly-developed cerebral cortex gives us a planning and implementation advantage to go along with our thumbs.</p>

<p>But when it comes right down to it, I suppose our species' tendency toward and efficiency at violence has been the most significant characteristic that has enabled it to subjugate (or eliminate) other species on the planet.</p>

<p>first of all, every species is violent. In fact we are probably the more civil out of all species..given (most of us) would not eat our children or kill our neighbors for coming into our territory</p>

<p>what's the difference?
1. we seek to invent new materials rather than use the ones around us
2. we have highly developed brains, are capable of abstract reasoning, language, introspection, and problem solving
3. uniquely adept at utilizing systems of communication for self-expression, the exchange of ideas, and organization
4. we're capapble of making advanced social structures
5. and we are the only species that are actually aware of that social structure, try to maintain our environment, and for the most part we care for the general public and seek protection for others (not just ourselves)
- you never see monkeys trying to save monkey-kind from extinction do you? no...every monkey only seeks to protect itself</p>

<p>id say were pretty different. just sayin</p>

<p>you never see monkeys trying to save monkey-kind from extinction do you? no...every monkey only seeks to protect itself</p>

<p>What are you saying- that other species don't care for those outside their species?
That is false.
Or are you saying that other species don't have communities/ pass on learning?
That is false as well- could you explain further what you mean?</p>

<p><a href="http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?id=our-nature-is-nurture-are-shifts-in-2010-07-12%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?id=our-nature-is-nurture-are-shifts-in-2010-07-12&lt;/a>
To prevent male infanticide, a female langur may mate with many males, who then refrain from killing infants because they think they may be the father. But females may also abandon or kill infants that they lack the resources to raise.</p>

<p>Oh so that is why they act that way.</p>

<p>im saying species don't care for the well-being of their entire species, or any other species. They only care for themselves and their immediate family/group (their mate, children, or pack). </p>

<p>Of course, this can be because they are unaware of the threats their species and other species face...but then that's just another difference between us. Humans seek to understand potential threats to all of human-kind, whereas every other species only sees the threats that they themselves face</p>

<p>i do agree with your second statement, because some species do have communities</p>

<p>"Or are we the same, just different?"</p>

<p>Help! I've searched and searched but can't find evidence of crows building an Eiffel tower ... or discovering an antibiotic ... or sending their little crowlings to university ... or ....</p>

<p>From the scientific american link</p>

<p>*Child-rearing is radically different in hunter–gatherer societies like the African !Kung, Hadza and Aka, who are thought to live more or less as our ancestors did for 99 percent of our evolutionary history. Mothers in these societies get lots of help from other females, including grandmas, sisters and friends, who may even breast-feed an unrelated child. Dads and other males often hold, feed and play with children, too, which ape males never do.</p>

<p>There is a dark underside to all this group nurturing. A human mother's care for her infant is more contingent on circumstance than the care of ape moms. If a hunter–gatherer mother feels she's not getting enough support from others, she may abandon or kill her newborn. Natural selection thus favored babies who excel at "mind-reading"; they can intuit and manipulate the emotions of their mothers and other potential caregivers, to ensure that they get the care they need to survive. Empathetic kids become empathetic adults. In this way cooperative breeding promoted the emergence of our extraordinary "hypersocial" intelligence.*</p>

<p>* but can't find evidence of crows building an Eiffel tower ... *
or weapons of mass destruction or torture chambers or...but I will get you the crow link</p>

<p>Humans are capable of "Ivy envy" ... that's what makes us special.</p>

<p>yes...like i said other species take care of those in their imediate family...</p>

<p>And you are using monkeys as an example, whcih happen to by the closest relatives to humans....take a look at most other species. they do things entirely different. Like the prey mantis (idk about spelling..), the male prey mantis will rip the head of its mate while mating, killing it, to make the sex better for him...have you ever seen a human do that?</p>

<p>Plus, humans dont kill their kids when we cant support them... humans have come up with laws preventing that, plus we have made systems such as adoption so that all kids will be taken care of. Have you ever seen an adoption program in the animal kingdom? That goes to show that humans seek to invent things that benefit all of human-kind and promote everyone's well-being. With animals, there is none of this</p>

<p>Just search for Crows & tools- lots of other species use tools too.</p>

<p>FOXNews.com</a> - Bird Brain?</p>

<p>Chimps</a> Use "Spears" to Hunt Mammals, Study Says</p>

<p>and do math
;)
Elephants</a> show flair for arithmetic -Times Online
Chimps</a> outperform humans at memory task - life - New Scientist</p>

<p>Really it makes sense- evolutionary wise- you have a better chance at survival if you can problem solve- especially if you don't have opposable thumbs.</p>

<p>* Plus, humans dont kill their kids when we cant support them... humans have come up with laws preventing that, *</p>

<p>You might turn on the news once in a while.</p>

<p>Im not talking about laws trying to control human behavior in L.A., I am talking about species behavior worldwide</p>

<p>
[quote]

Despite the clear theistic prohibitions against child-murder by the three major Western religions, female infanticide has been for centuries a prominent and socially acceptable event in two related areas of the world: India and China. Even today, the extent of the problem is measured in frightening proportions: "at least 60 million females in Asia are missing and feared dead, victims of nothing more than their sex. Worldwide, research suggests, the number of missing females may top 100 million. "</p>

<p>The data is truly astounding, Estimates indicate that 30.5 million females are "missing" from China, 22.8 million in India, 3.1 million in Pakistan, 1.6 million in Bangladesh, 1.7 million in West Asia, 600,000 in Egypt, and 200,000 in Nepal.

[/quote]
</p>

<p><a href="http://www.worldpulse.com/node/22365%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.worldpulse.com/node/22365&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>haha yeah obviously there are cases where women kill their kids and where guys kill the women they have sex with. it's called crimes? It's called people with ****ed up heads? we are not all like that. there's a reason all that's in the news, it beacuse it wierd, shocking, and disturbing. Which means that behavior is frowned upon by most humans. If that was normal behavior, it wouldn't be in the news now would it?</p>

<p>When I read that, im digusted by the fact that people do that. if a monkey heard of another monkey killing its kids it wouldn't care at all...thats perfectly acceptable in the monkey world</p>

<p>if a monkey heard of another monkey killing its kids it wouldn't care at all...thats perfectly acceptable in the monkey world</p>

<p>Well * Monkeys* are quite a bit different- but * Apes* will mourn their dead and care for babies without parents.</p>

<p>
[quote]
On occasion, gorillas have also been known to 'bury' their dead, by covering the body with leaves.</p>

<p>Read more: A</a> mother's grief: Heartbroken gorilla cradles her dead baby | Mail Online

[/quote]
</p>

<p>that doesn't mean apes make laws to prevent the death of ape babbies everywhere. And yes, again, they care for those in their immediate family or group. They know nothing, and do not seek to know anything, about other apes around the world. In fact, they probably don't even know there are apes around the world...they don't even know what the world is or how big it is etc....therefore they do not care for obtaining knowledge...therefore they are nothing like humans.. </p>

<p>And just because they bury their dead doesnt mean they didnt kill them in the first place...here let me go kill my mom. Ill make sure to bury her though. that will make it okay?</p>

<p>
[quote]
They know nothing, and do not seek to know anything

[/quote]
</p>

<p>To a Zen monk, this is the highest ideal. Notice I said Zen monk, not Zen monkey. :)</p>

<p>uhhh....okayy? if your talking about a monk monk...like the bald religious guys...?</p>

<p>If so, thank you for helping my case, for only humans are able to wish to dumb themselves down. Monks always have the capability to obtain more knowledge, but if they wish to reach a lower level of knowledge, then that's their choice. Monkeys, on the other hand, do not wish to obtain any higher or lower level of knowledge at all.</p>

<p>ya see my point?</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
In fact, they probably don't even know there are apes around the world...they don't even know what the world is or how big it is etc....therefore they do not care for obtaining knowledge...therefore they are nothing like humans..

[/QUOTE]
</p>

<p>Human beings raised in extremely isolated communities had no such knowledge either. </p>

<p>Assuming you even understand the difference between apes and monkeys, which appears highly doubtful given your previous posts, the proposition that apes are "nothing like" humans is absurd. It's impossible for any thinking person to observe a group of apes without sensing the similarities.</p>

<p>Donna Tjenglund, is in high school, so he/she probably hasn't had logic or anthropology yet- maybe jr year.... schools these days :rolleyes: I thought everyone who had cable had the Discovery channel. :confused:</p>