What would be more beneficial: Chemistry or Physics?

<p>I am a high school student who requires one year of a physical science in order to graduate. My choices are either Physics or Chemistry. I have no intention of pursuing a career in which either of these subjects will be used dramatically, so thus, my question is, which would be most useful for me in everyday situations?</p>

<p>Physics, probably. For example, you get to learn that when you're driving down a hill and the car starts to slide as it encounters ice, it's better to lock the front brake than the back brake. If you're mountain climbing or something you can find out how far up you are by dropping a rock down a cliff and measuring how long it takes for it to hit the ground---> more useful for everyday life :P</p>

<p>Physics is easier (at least if you like math). I thought Chemistry was a really good class, it's required at my school and physics is optional.</p>

<p>I'd go with Physics.</p>

<p>If you're considering a career in the lustrous meth lab industry, you may find chemistry especially useful. </p>

<p>For everything else, you're probably better off with physics. (For those not incredibly math inclined, though, high school level chemistry is incredibly lax math-wise. Rarely [read: never] will you have to use any skills above Algebra I, besides mindlessly hitting the common/natural log button on your calculator).</p>

<p>If you're into med school, then Chemistry is best.
Otherwise if you want to have a fun class, physics by far.</p>

<p>If you are interested in biology, agriculture, materials sciences, etc., then chemistry is very helpful. If you are interested in astronomy or math, physics could be useful. Problem-solving skills are important for both subjects.</p>

<p>If you want to know how/why everyday life operates, take chem. For example, I learned that boiling and cooking pasta could have varying cooking times in different places because of the altitudes. Physics would be more applicable. But personally i found no use for it because honestly, i'm not going to calculate the speed i need to drive when turning without flying off the road...</p>

<p>Physics</p>

<p>It is a more fundamental science than chem. Chem is just applied physics.</p>

<p>Im going to stray away from the pack here and say Chemistry. </p>

<p>" If you're mountain climbing or something you can find out how far up you are by dropping a rock down a cliff and measuring how long it takes for it to hit the ground---> more useful for everyday life :P"</p>

<p>Why is that useful. If you're climbing a mountain you probably know how high up you are. And what would you do with that info?</p>

<p>esthetique has a point. Chem teaches you about how everyday life works far better than physics. </p>

<p>"because honestly, i'm not going to calculate the speed i need to drive when turning without flying off the road..."</p>

<p>this^^^ physics is just quantifying things that happen. And is completely useless because by the time you figure the answer out, its already too late. Whereas with Chemistry on the other hand, we got to blow stuff up and play with acids. Much more fun.</p>

<p>Hmm tough question. For everyday life practicality, I'd have to agree with the poster above me and say Chemistry.</p>

<p>chemistry is a slacker subject so pick that</p>