What's your opinion on this schedule?

<p>-Semester 1, Fall
(4) Calculus 1
(4) General Physics 1
(2) Intro to Engineering Design
(4) Into to Psychology</p>

<p>-Semester 2, Spring
(3) Principles of Engineering
(3) Engineering Thermodynamics
(4) Calculus 2
(4) General Physics 2
(3) Philosophy: Critical Thinking</p>

<p>-Semester, Summer
(3) Calculus 3
(3) Freshman Composition</p>

<p>-Semester 3, Fall
(3) Technical Writing
(3) Statics
(3) Engineering Thermodynamics 2
(3) Intro to Differential Equations
(3) Intro to Linear Algebra
(3) Independent Study - Research Project</p>

<p>-Semester 4, Spring
(3) Mech-Etronics 1
(3) Dynamics
(3) Fluid Mechanics
(3) Heat and Mass Transfer
(3) Intro to Probability and Statistics
(3) General Physics 3
(3) Modern Physics</p>

<p>-Semester 5, Fall
(3) Mech-Etronics 2
(3) Strengths of Materials
(3) Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems
(3) Intermediate Dynamics
(3) Nuclear Physics</p>

<p>-Semester 6, Spring
(3) Nuclear Chemistry
(3) Engineering Measurements Lab 1
(3) Machine Design
(3) Controls of Aero-Mechanical Systems
(3) Complex Variables
(3) Special and General Relativity</p>

<p>-Semester 7, Fall
(3) Intro to Financial Accounting
(3) Material Science
(3) Kinematics
(3) Applied Mathematics/Partial Differential Equations
(3) History of Physics
(3) Quantum Mechanics
(1) Senior Design 1</p>

<p>-Semester 8, Spring
(3) Principles of Marketing
(3) Senior Design 2
(3) Engineering Measurements Lab 2
(3) Quantum Mechanics 2
(3) Ordinary Differential Equations
(3) Propulsion Systems</p>

<p>For what major...?</p>

<p>looks like a mechanical major with a bunch of extra math and physics. did you design this yourself? what year are you in</p>

<p>seems rough, but fine if you are going to grad school</p>

<p>if no grad school, you dont seem to have any relevant tech electives</p>

<p>Also, school gets rougher as time goes on. And you have loaded your last few semesters. Im looking at your last two springs, especially with senior design tacked on like an afterthought. Thats a big deal. Also, labs at the upper level are not like they are freshman or sophomore year. I'm talking 20-50 page reports, and hours in the lab, even outside of the class time</p>

<p>I don't know what major or school this is for, something you may want to consider is that senior design projects can be very time intensive. I would look into that, if you find they typically are at your school, i would not take an 18hr load that semester.</p>

<p>That's a nearly impossible schedule. Taking 18 credits with a Senior Design course would be extremely difficult. In engineering, a full load is 12-15. I don't know anyone taking more than that. The semester where there's 21 credits is just stupid. A lot of these classes take a ridiculous amount of time and a common course suggestion for a senior year with a design course would include 12 credits a semester.</p>

<p>Your senior year schedule is death.</p>

<p>Not just her/his senior year... but his entire college life spells out no life (in my standards).</p>

<p>146 credits... is this a double degree?
I would personally do that independent study during your junior year when you know what you want to further study.</p>

<p>I've heard of schools requiring 140+ credits just for a BS in engineering. Mine was 135 credits. </p>

<p>I wouldn't even waste time planning out 4 years of courses, because it'll never work out. Sometimes you get closed out of courses because it's full. Sometimes it stops getting offered for various reasons. Sometimes there'll be new courses that'll interest you. Then there'll be the times when courses conflict with each other. Don't bother as long as you don't fall behind.</p>

<p>This is for a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering with a few extra math and physics classes in there. I'm in semester 6 right now but our fall schedule was just published so I'm trying to figure out what I can do to prepare for grad school in nuclear engineering but not get burned out like you guys are implying for next year.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Taking 18 credits with a Senior Design course would be extremely difficult. In engineering, a full load is 12-15. I don't know anyone taking more than that. The semester where there's 21 credits is just stupid.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I took nineteen hours including senior design my senior year, and was drum major of the university band at the same time, which was ~40hr/wk commitment. I... wouldn't recommend it. There was a lot of sitting-in-small-rooms-and-staring-for-half-an-hour every day so that I could avoid turning around and biting people's heads off. </p>

<p>Are these all required for your major? Also keep in mind that you need some time to devote to your grad school applications. Don't worry about preparing yourself for grad school. Your degree will prepare you for grad school, you shouldn't need to take a whole bunch of extra courses to supplement your undergraduate education. Find out exactly what you NEED to take, if there are any courses that you'd need for SPECIFIC programs, and take ONLY those and whatever else it is you'd need to graduate. That schedule reads like a kamikaze mission, and your grad school applications will suffer as a result.</p>

<p>talk to someone from the nuclear program you are interested in. They will probably tell you that they will accommodate a mechanical engineer, even without a suicidal load.</p>

<p>Its not that we think you'll burn out, you just shouldnt do that to yourself. Its not about the love for the subject, thats just a stressful lifestyle</p>

<p>
[quote]
Also, school gets rougher as time goes on. And you have loaded your last few semesters. Im looking at your last two springs, especially with senior design tacked on like an afterthought. Thats a big deal. Also, labs at the upper level are not like they are freshman or sophomore year. I'm talking 20-50 page reports, and hours in the lab, even outside of the class time

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Are you really serious about the lab reports?</p>

<p>"are you really serious about the lab reports?"</p>

<p>yes, but it's not as bad as you think because graphs and tables take up a lot of room. Still, I've worked on reports for 40 hours</p>

<p>
[quote]

I took nineteen hours including senior design my senior year,

[/quote]

Hey aibarr, what does a senior design project consist of? Are you in control of it, and do you have a mentor (professor) to monitor your progress?</p>

<p>I was also wondering how much time is spent on one on average, and what goes one in class. At our school, we have a two courses required for design - one to learn about design or something, and a course taken the subsequent quarter implementing the design I think.</p>

<p>Ok, so do the 20-50 pages of reports cover one engineering class, or all of the classes?</p>

<p>I've had two labs with excruciatingly long lab reports. They also trick you by only being one or two credits. Just make sure to find the reputation of classes before building your schedule. And be wary of the innocent looking two credit lab</p>

<p>
[quote]
Quote:
I took nineteen hours including senior design my senior year, </p>

<p>Hey aibarr, what does a senior design project consist of? Are you in control of it, and do you have a mentor (professor) to monitor your progress?</p>

<p>I was also wondering how much time is spent on one on average, and what goes one in class. At our school, we have a two courses required for design - one to learn about design or something, and a course taken the subsequent quarter implementing the design I think.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yeah, you do have a professor mentor... Which helps, a little bit. It's typically a real-world situation where you take a project definition and basically complete the project without a ton of guidance. For ours, we got a list of tasks that had to be completed (all were rather vaguely worded) and you had to come up with a plan of attack. As with all large-scale group projects, there's a lot of collaboration that goes on, and a <em>ton</em> of group work towards the end, coming up with a polished presentation for our "client". How many hours kind of depends upon the project and the setting.</p>

<p>My senior design project was along the same lines as aibarr's. We took a real-world project (or a project that is realistic) and did our own design for it. At the beginning of the year (it was 2 semesters, 3 credits each), we were pretty much given a list of deliverables and what was expected. It was a cradle to grave approach, covering everything from the initial concept to the final design details and cost estimates.</p>

<p>The class itself wasn't as much of a real class. It was basically each group meeting individually with the professors to discuss the progress of the project and deliverables. There wasn't really a formal "learning" component to it. We used the knowledge we gained in previous courses. There was definitely a lot of collaboration too. We worked in groups of three, but I've seen groups at other schools with as many as five. </p>

<p>As for time spent, it probably varies immensely. There were some weekends where I spent 20+ hours on the senior design project alone.</p>