When do I withdraw all applications for Early Decision?

<p>Si was accepted under an Early Decision plan, but since financial aid was a factor for me, I did not withdraw applications right away, my dad also sent in an appeal and I am still awaiting an official response. Now would I get a mail stating my final financial aid package, or should I just go ahead and withdraw applications. I was just notified I was accepted to Richmond which was one of the applications I need to withdraw, so I feel like I need to act fast. Also do you withdraw applications to colleges you were already accepted too?</p>

<p>I believe until you get an answer back on the appeal you can keep your apps open. Once you find out about the appeal you can decide if it's affordable. Then you notify all the schools (if you're going forward with the ED school).</p>

<p>This is exactly the problem that was created by the nebulous language of the Common Application and the subsequent self-serving interpretation of the ED binding nature. </p>

<p>It seems that some believe that all that is required is to file an "appeal" to delay the acceptance of the ED offer. However, this would also transform ED applications into EA applications, with even fewer restrictions that the REA/SCEA. It also would create options that do NOT exist, namely being able to keep applications open after accepting an ED offer of admission. </p>

<p>None of us can provide you the correct answer. I would, however, contact your ED school for immediate direction, and perhaps an answer to your financial aid appeal. You should also be very forthcoming in that you still have to withdraw your other applications, although that window closed when you accepted the ED offer of admission. Of course, I assume that you did, in fact, accept the ED offer, but filed an appeal as you considered the financial insufficient.</p>

<p>^^as a follow up to xiggi's politically correct post, see the following post from the OP as of 2/24/2011:</p>

<p>""So I recently was accepted to Lehigh University via Early Decision II plan, I received my financial aid package, my EFC being 1192, and received 43000 in grants. Yes, a decent financial aid package for an Early Decision candidate, but this cost my family $10,000 a year, which my dad cannot afford. Yes, I have had a job the past two summers only to pay for the bills however. The question is my dad sent in an appeal letter as of two weeks ago, and my financial aid status is currently under review. The deadline to enroll my deposit is February 28. I called in to see if an extension is available for those concerned on financial aid, because as of now Lehigh is unaffordable for my family, and they said I must write a personal appeal letter to the Dean of Admissions, who may have do two things. Give me an extension or rescind my application for not following the Early Decision commitment. Lehigh is clearly my top choice in colleges now and is truly where I wish to attend so I do not want to have the Dean suspect I am trying to compare financial aid packages as the lady suggested. She asked for my name too, but I declined, since she said she was going to inform the Dean about an upcoming appeal letter, and I did not wish for him to rescind my application or chance it. What should I do exactly?""</p>

<p>to the OP: what was the answer from the Lehigh admissions director? did you get the extension you asked for?</p>

<p>^^--^^</p>

<p>Obviously, I was not aware that this was an EDII application with a reply deadline of Feb 28. </p>

<p>Since the applicant filed an appeal two weeks before the deadline, it would be drastic for the school to rescind the admission without reviewing the file. This should not take too long.</p>

<p>I did accept the ED offer of admission and sent in my deposit, but still have not heard word about the appeal. Will this come in a letter? Also I never asked for an extension because I could not risk my acceptance being rescinded. I want to make sure my financial aid package is final prior to withdrawing</p>

<p>I'm not sure I understand all the facts, but it seems to me that you should have filed your appeal (and received a decision) before accepting the offer of admission. You wanted to lock in a firm commitment by the school to admit you early, without (in return) offering a firm commitment to attend. Now it may appear that you are continuing to wait on, compare and negotiate offers after you've already accepted an ED offer of admission (or that you are simply having "buyer's remorse").</p>

<p>You did file an appeal before the enrollment deadline, but you also submitted your deposit before receiving a response to the appeal. This could be interpreted as a signal that you were ready to attend and pay for this school based on the terms of the original offer (regardless of the appeal outcome).</p>

<p>Lehigh cannot force you to attend if you cannot afford it, but if they wanted to, they perhaps could influence decisions by other schools. So there may be a little risk here if you do not work with Lehigh, in good faith, to resolve these issues. I suggest you ask your school Guidance Counsellor to intercede. Let him or her (or another competent advocate) handle the communications from here. </p>

<p>If I were your GC, I'd probably work from the assumption that you do want to attend Lehigh. They've given you a rather generous aid package; now there should be some way to close that $10K/year gap. Lehigh has an interest in helping you do that, so why not work together with them to achieve that goal?</p>

<p>In other words, by your actions, you may have sent an ambiguous message to Lehigh.</p>

<p>Interpretation #1 (what you think you said):
I accept your offer of admission conditionally, that is, only if you increase my financial aid.</p>

<p>Interpretation #2 (what Lehigh may think you said):
I accept your offer of admission unconditionally; I definitely plan to attend. But by the way, I could use more financial aid.</p>

<p>If Lehigh is working on assumption #2, is it possible they are waiting until May before addressing your appeal? Sounds like you do need to clear this up soon. Talk to your GC about your situation. Ask him or her to please make a call.</p>

<p>
[quote]
So I recently was accepted to Lehigh University via Early Decision II plan, I received my financial aid package, my EFC being 1192, and received 43000 in grants. Yes, a decent financial aid package for an Early Decision candidate, but this cost my family $10,000 a year, which my dad cannot afford.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>so what's up with this?</p>

<p>$43,000 in grants
+$5,500 in student loans
+$2,000 in work study during school year
=$50,500 out of $53,000 total cost</p>

<p>your EFC is $1,192</p>

<p>so</p>

<p>you are going to turn down a great school like Like Lehigh because of a short fall of $1,308 in total?</p>

<p>^ Don't forget summer employment.
$7.25/hr. x 40 hrs. x 12 weeks = $3,480</p>

<p>I just don't understand applicants who apply ED if they know they cannot afford to attend ...</p>

<p>But how can they know they can't afford it without applying? One way is if the school provides an accurate calculator; if the calculator shows the school is unaffordable, ED application should be forgone. I didn't see that this (or something similar) is the case here.</p>

<p>Okay, I'll re-phrase. I just don't understand applicants who apply ED if they are not certain they can afford to attend. If they do not have the cash in hand, they should apply to several schools to see who offers the best financial package. You should only apply ED if you know for certain you can pay for it, with or without aid.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I suggest you ask your school Guidance Counsellor to intercede. Let him or her (or another competent advocate) handle the communications from here.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That is neither feasible nor recommended.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Okay, I'll re-phrase. I just don't understand applicants who apply ED if they are not certain they can afford to attend. If they do not have the cash in hand, they should apply to several schools to see who offers the best financial package. You should only apply ED if you know for certain you can pay for it, with or without aid.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Not quite true in 2011. The language added to the Common Application has made it feasible for student to "test the waters" and apply ED with the right to decide if the financial aid is sufficient. This is a departure from the days that the student would have to be RELEASED from his or her binding contract. </p>

<p>In fact, for students who need full need-based aid (read zero EFC,) the ED is a remarkable tool to level the playing field. </p>

<p>However, the caveat is that this "free look" should extend the reply time beyond a very reasonable time. To be clear a very reasonable time is measured in days or weeks, but specifically not throughout March or April.</p>

<p>Also, ED needing financial aid should be reserved for the number one choice, where the only question is: can I afford it? Some schools are trying to dispel the notion that ED is only for the well-to-do.</p>

<p>Edit: </p>

<p>Not quite true in 2011. The language added to the Common Application has made it feasible for students to "test the waters" and apply ED with the right to decide if the financial aid is sufficient. This is a departure from the days when the student would have to be RELEASED from his or her binding contract. </p>

<p>In fact, for students who need full need-based aid (read zero EFC,) the ED is a remarkable tool to level the playing field. </p>

<p>However, the caveat is that this "free look" should NOT extend the reply time beyond a very reasonable time. To be clear a very reasonable time is measured in days or weeks, but specifically not throughout March or April.</p>

<p>/darn iPad!</p>

<p>
[quote]

[quote]

I suggest you ask your school Guidance Counsellor to intercede. Let him or her (or another competent advocate) handle the communications from here.

[/quote]

That is neither feasible nor recommended.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>xiggi, why do you believe it is not feasible?</p>

<p>I dont know how to respond to all these posts, but hopefully I answer them all</p>

<p>The reason I accepted the offer of admission without hearing back from the appeal was the deadline was set, and I was told if you missed the deadline your acceptance would be rescinded, thus came the call came for an extension and as I learned that the dean will either give an extension or rescind my application caused me to accept the offer right away. I definitely meant it as a option #2. </p>

<p>Also as for Early Decision, I mainly did it to enhance my chances of getting accepted, to be honest I was pretty surprised when they did accept me, however I also saw people from ED I get fantastic financial aid packages, and thought maybe my financial package won't be as bad being ED II. </p>

<p>Also my parents refer to the student loans as money in order to be paid, so were hoping maybe less loans, and more grants and what not. I decided to call Lehigh call Monday and ask what I should do</p>

<p>
[quote]
xiggi, why do you believe it is not feasible?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>For the simplest of reasons: schools will only discuss financial aid reviews with the applicant and the parents. I could also add that such *private *issues are well beyond the payscale and capabilities of GCs.</p>