When will Bostonians give up those ridiculous accents?

<p>I love hearing different accents. It would be so dull if we all sounded alike.</p>

<p>Oh come on...if folks didn't have accents, how would you guess where they came from? </p>

<p>Sorry...these are regional differences in speaking and I respect them. I don't see anything wrong with them at all.</p>

<p>I love to hear an authentic Boston, New York, or southern accent. Only the nasal twanged flat-voweled Michigan accents irritate me. (Yet somehow the Chicago twang retains some charm.)</p>

<p>Long live regional differences.</p>

<p>I grew up very close to Boston and I have a heavy accent. The funny thing is that I find the accent varies from town to town. The further you get from Boston the less dramatic the accent is. I have raised my children about 30 miles south of Boston and the people who grow up here can tell that I grew up closer to Boston because of my accent. My own children speak differently than I do and are quick to poke fun at me.</p>

<p>I tend to be drawn to people who have a heavy accent like I do. Not because I am being nostalgic about my childhood but because the area I grew up in was down to earth, blue collar, working class and I find that we share a meat and potatoes sensibility that has common roots.</p>

<p>I used to be a little embarassed by my "native tongue" but as i get older I embrace it and am proud of the history it represents. </p>

<p>And yes, I love Julianne Moore but the accent makes me grit my teeth. There is nothing authentic about it.</p>

<p>I have a good friend, a German linguist, whose speciality is American accents. He claims that the Americans with the least accent are people from Northern California and people from near, but not in Chicago ( the suburbs are considered in Chicago.)</p>

<p>I first met him at a dinner party of Americas, all of whom were new to him. He went around the table and guessed where everyone was from. When he got to me he was completely stumped. I finally told him that I had grown up about 120 miles outside Chicago with a mother who was a speech pathologist from Northern California. He just beamed.</p>

<p>I lived in Boston for 10 years; I love and miss a good Boston accent and all the regional phrases that go with it. When we first moved down south I was in a parent conference and told the mom that her daughter was wicked smart (I know, not the most professional phrasing, but it was the end of a long day) and she just started laughing at me. She had also gone to school in Boston and could immediately tell where I had lived. I grew up in Connecticut and we don't really have a distinct accent; we all sound like news anchors. My husband is from the Boston area and has a little bit of an accent, but his father has the really thick Boston accent.</p>

<p>wicked
Tonic
dungarees
supper (suppah)</p>

<p>Add me to the list of those who can't stand Julianne Moore's take on a Boston accent.
It's almost as irritating as Cher's phony Brooklyn accent in Moonstruck (and I LOVED Moonstruck). Bleh.</p>

<p>frappe (milk shake)
grinder (sub) - The first time I asked for a grinder down here I got quite a look.
the Packie - package store - place to buy booze</p>

<p>dmd77, the Kennedys don't have Boston accents. They have an accent that is all their own. No one actually sounds like a Kennedy except the Kennedys. It's wierd.</p>

<p>I grew up in NJ with parents from SC. My NJ friends said I had a Southern accent, my SC relatives made fun of my "Yankee" accent. Then I moved to the Boston area, and have been here for 20+ years. I'm not sure where I sound like now, but I do say "wicked" a lot. </p>

<p>Steven Colbert has no accent, despite growing up in SC. He says that he quickly figured out how others perceived a southern accent when he was watching TV and realized that the fastest way for a show to convey that a character was stupid was to give him/her a Southern accent. (I could say the same about a Brooklyn accent). He used that fact as incentive to work on losing his accent.
But to me, a mild Southern accent is warm and friendly - maybe because my relatives are from there. I kind of enjoy regional accents, when they're not so strong as to seem like almost another language entirely.</p>

<p>EPTR, you are SO right about how specific different New England accents are! It's almost neighborhood-by-neighborhood. Our suburban town has a specific accent, sort of a cross between Boston and RI. I know kids with mild accents, their parents accents are thicker because they grew up in Boston but the kids are growing up in the 'burbs.</p>

<p>Julianne Moore is a chowdarhed</p>

<p>Funny accent story - my aunt & uncle from S.Carolina were on Cape Cod, with my parents (my parents were originally from SC, but had lived in NJ for 20 years, and had been visiting us in Mass for about 5 years). My uncle pulled up to the entrance for the ferry to Martha's Vineyard, and rolled down his window.</p>

<p>Attendant: Pahkin?
Uncle: 'Scuse me?
Attendant: Ah you pahkin?
Uncle: No, I wanna purk mah cur!
My parents laughed till they cried. My uncle and the attendant were talking about the same thing and had NO idea!</p>

<p>
[quote]

Steven Colbert has no accent, despite growing up in SC. He says that he quickly figured out how others perceived a southern accent when he was watching TV and realized that the fastest way for a show to convey that a character was stupid was to give him/her a Southern accent. (I could say the same about a Brooklyn accent). He used that fact as incentive to work on losing his accent.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I have five siblings. Only two of us have southern accents. The other four have made a point of avoiding developing the accent entirely for that very reason. All of us are educated and intelligent to varying degrees, but my sister with the genius IQ actually has the strongest southern accent of all of us. Go figure.</p>

<p>Nrdsb4 said:

[quote]
Well, I have a lot of family in northern California, and I don't really hear an accent per se when they speak.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>lololu said:

[quote]
I have a good friend, a German linguist, whose speciality is American accents. He claims that the Americans with the least accent are people from Northern California and people from near, but not in Chicago ( the suburbs are considered in Chicago.)

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Ha! I'm good.</p>

<p>"Did you know you can listen to tapes of meeting in John F Kennedy's office?"</p>

<p>Good thing to know in case I don't have a chalkboard handy to scratch my fingernails on.</p>

<p>I have been in North Carolina for 15 years. I hardly notice the southern accent anymore. I have picked up some of the phrases down here. When the boys were little I remember the first time I referred to a temper tantrum as "pitching a fit". I thought it described my son's behavior perfectly.</p>

<p>In the scruffy Boston suburb where I went to high school, they called school bathrooms "basements," as in "I have to go to the basement." Anybody else hear that sort of thing in the Boston area? They also used the adjective "pi$$ah" to describe anything they liked, as in "That movie was pi<strong>ah." I could never figure ouif it was spelled pi</strong>er, pi<strong>a, pi</strong>ah, or whatever. Anybody know?</p>

<p>I'm familiar with the annoyingly flat Michigan "a" sound, and from what I can tell, it's more of a nasal condition than an accent. Even in the same family, some people will have it and some won't. I've heard Michigan is really horrendous for allergies, so the residents have more than their share of plugged up nasal passages. Don't know if that's true or not, but that's often the local explanation.</p>

<p>I've always heard it as wicked pi$$ah - meaning really good. I have also noticed that supper becomes suppah and Wanda becomes Wander. The "er" at the end of a word has an "ah" sound and the "a" on the end has an "er" sound.</p>

<p>In the semi-scruffy Boston suburb where I went to school, the school bathroom (built in 1912) was called the “basement” because it was in the basement.
And the movie wasn’t just pi$$ah it was wicked pi$$ah.</p>

<p>"EPTR, you are SO right about how specific different New England accents are! It's almost neighborhood-by-neighborhood."</p>

<p>One word that seems to have a lot of local variants is "sure." Sometimes it's "SHOO-ah," sometimes it's "shaw." Sometimes it's "shua." Etc.</p>

<p>Lafalum, you don't perhaps live in a suburb near the RI border that's named after a founding father who's famous for flying a kite, do you?</p>