When will Bostonians give up those ridiculous accents?

<p>Saw Julianne Moore on "30 Rock" last night and had flashbacks to my days in high school and college in/near Boston. She had the most accurate Boston accent I've evah heard on TV. We can put a man on the moon but we can't get Bostonians to speak like they don't have a mouth full of peanut buttah?</p>

<p>Same goes for you too, New Yawkahs and Southerners. </p>

<p>And don't give me that "We're not the ones with the accent" crap.</p>

<p>So where do YOU come from? One of those places where they have only one vowel sound? :)</p>

<p>
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When will Bostonians give up those ridiculous accents?

[/quote]

When Southerners talk faster and the Midwest gets rid of the flat A.</p>

<p>I tune in 30 Rock JUST to hear Julianne Moore play that character. Love her.</p>

<p>I haven't lived in the midwest in over 25 years, but I still sound like everyone in Chicago. I guess the accent's not going away.</p>

<p>Given the Bostonian accent is the closest to the mother tongue, what are we doing calling them the odd ones?</p>

<p>From someone that spent years in and around Boston ... I love Julianne Moore, but her accent was just awful. And I'm FAR from the only one that thinks so:</p>

<p>IMDb</a> :: Boards :: Julianne Moore :: Boston Accent</p>

<p>Let's not get bogged down on Julianne Moore, and I don't buy that "mother tongue" crap, ...they don't know how to talk over there, either. </p>

<p>I'm saying that even in western Mass., western PA, and in upstate NY they talk a lot like people in the midwest and west (with some MINOR regional variations--I know there is a bit of a rural twang everywhere, Chicago & western PA have their distinctions, etc. ). And this is the standard way of talking on national TV shows. I'm not worried about Maine...they have their own thing going on up there. But what the hell is up with you guys in Boston, NYC, and the South?</p>

<p>Hey, my H is from Chicago area....</p>

<p>and he calls "college" -- caw lege</p>

<p>and sophomore --- south more</p>

<p>and baby doll ----- baby dowel.</p>

<p>Of course, being from Southern California...I don't have an accent. LOL ;) (wanna, gonna, and doncha are all real words)</p>

<p>
[quote]
When Southerners talk faster and the Midwest gets rid of the flat A.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I have a southern accent, but I talk very fast. My mother always said she couldn't understand a word I said. My fast talking brother had no problem with me, though, and my Mom used to watch us interacting in total wonderment, her head going back and forth between us as though she was watching a tennis match. It was funny for us; almost like having a secret language.</p>

<p>I've lived in da city a Chicawgo, and am aware of all the hizzoner da mare stuff, but nobody from Chicago will get laughed at in Denver or San Francisco or Albany.</p>

<p>I agree with ctyankee - I lived in Boston for a few years, and Julianne Moore's accent is atrocious. I love Boston accents but I don't like hers one bit.</p>

<p>I think most regional accents are fascinating. It would be very boring if we all spoke alike.</p>

<p><em>posted from the land of the Fluffia Iggles and the Inkwire newspaper</em> ;)</p>

<p>I love trying to figure out regional/foreign accents. I was born and raised in Miami and I often hear "are you from Brazil/NY/Canada/Cuba?" from snowbirds and tourists. It's amusing!</p>

<p>I think Boston accents ah ch-ah-ming!</p>

<p>I agree with Booklady, I love hearing different accents. What a boring, boring country this would be if we all sounded alike.</p>

<p>Again, I understand the charm of MINOR regional accents. I'm talking about the type of accents that make you want to rip your ears off, like Gia's mother's NYC accent on the last season of "The Bachelor." In movies/TV, you almost never hear Boston-area accents that are as extreme as many of the people there actually have. Like in "Good Will Hunting," there was NOTHING as extreme as what passed for English at my lower-middle-class suburban Boston high school. Even a guy like John Kerry has about zero accent compared to the more extreme Boston accents.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Given the Bostonian accent is the closest to the mother tongue, what are we doing calling them the odd ones?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>You mean like English accents? ... because a Bostonian accent isn't really close to that...</p>

<p>Though they have preserved the pronunciation of the various place names that are the same.</p>

<p>
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Of course, being from Southern California...I don't have an accent.

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</p>

<p>qft</p>

<p>There are many Boston / NE accents. The one Moore affects is not typical but stereotypical, which is the point. </p>

<p>The best Boston accents in films / TV by non-natives have been Amy Ryan in Gone, Baby, Gone - real Dot Ave sound-alike - and Leo DiCaprio in The Departed. I can't count Matt Damon or Casey Affleck because they grew up here, though not with those accents. Mark Wahlberg naturally has that accent.</p>

<p>Did you know you can listen to tapes of meeting in John F Kennedy's office? John</a> F. Kennedy - Meeting Recordings July / Aug. 1962 - Miller Center of Public Affairs</p>

<p>Now, there's a Boston accent!</p>

<p>I haven't been able to find anything like this for the US, but you can listen to people from all over the UK say different words at this site:</p>

<p>English</a> accents</p>

<p>
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Of course, being from Southern California...I don't have an accent.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Well, I have a lot of family in northern California, and I don't really hear an accent per se when they speak. Though I have a southern accent, it's not really extreme, but my California relatives do give me grief about it.</p>

<p>Gah! I love 30 rock best of all current TV but that is no Boston accent! I go do something else when she comes on. Pick the other girl FGS!</p>