Which of the three is the best for ChemE?

<p>I recently have gotten accepted to Rowan (almost full ride), Penn State, and I expect on getting into UW- Madison. Of the three which is the best for chemical engineering factoring in the money that I got from Rowan?</p>

<p>Thanks</p>

<p>According to US News, UW - Madison is the best.
Chemical</a> | Rankings | US News</p>

<p>It all depends if you think prestige matters and if you're willing to repay debt. Personally I would go with the full ride, but I know many would disagree with me.</p>

<p>In order to make this decision you have to consider what you want to do after college. A full-ride is a big deal. At the same time, UW-Madison will open doors for you that Rowan might not. What are your long-term goals? If you want to go to grad school, there will definitely be a lot more great research opportunities at UW. You will also have more access to recruiters from top companies. How much money are those things worth to you? If your goals are more modest, it might be more practical to go with the school that will not leave you in a lot of debt. </p>

<p>I would suggest first figuring out what you want to do in the long run, determining how you expect to do at either school, and quantifying the return on investment (this won't be too hard if your goal is to go to work after undergrad). Figure out what sort of salaries you're looking at with the GPA you can reasonably expect to get at each school, and compare the return on investment. Your investment at Rowan is 4 years opportunity cost of working. Your investment at UW is 4 years opportunity cost of working + 4 years (OOS?) tuition + interest on loans. Don't forget to also weigh which school you would be more happy at etc.</p>

<p>
[quote]
According to US News, UW - Madison is the best.
Chemical | Rankings | US News

[/quote]
</p>

<p>This is a rating for a school that offers a PHD degree and not a school that concentrates its educational efforts on undergrads. Big research universities see undergrads as "bothersome but necessary source of money". At Rowan, all ChemE classes are taught only by ChemE Phd's. Never a TA. </p>

<p>According to USN+WR Rowan is rated the 2nd best undergrad (no Phd) ChemE program in the nation. The industries that hire ChemE's are very aware of Rowan.</p>

<p>And if your future interests leans towards medicine, note that Rowan has recently opened it's own brand new medical school.</p>

<p>
[quote]
This is a rating for a school that offers a PHD degree and not a school that concentrates its educational efforts on undergrads. Big research universities see undergrads as "bothersome but necessary source of money". At Rowan, all ChemE classes are taught only by ChemE Phd's. Never a TA.

[/quote]

Source please.</p>

<p>My school is similar to Wisconsin. I've absolutely never heard of a chemical engineering course taught by a TA, and what is wrong with TAs anyway?</p>

<p>I've had a TA teach a course. It was an terrible experience. On the bright side, by the end of the course I could understand a thick Russian accent very well, I also learned a few Russian engineering terms.</p>

<p>[url=<a href="http://www.rowan.edu/colleges/engineering/programs/chemical/%5DSource%5B/url"&gt;http://www.rowan.edu/colleges/engineering/programs/chemical/]Source[/url&lt;/a&gt;]&lt;/p>

<p>10 char</p>

<p>I meant a source for this:

[quote]
Big research universities see undergrads as "bothersome but necessary source of money".

[/quote]
</p>