Who plan on going to grad school?

<p>Is having a just bachelors degree enough for a stable well paying career?</p>

<p>I would like to eventually go to graduate school. I have had repeated conversations with my history professor in which he states "when" not "if do your graduate work," so I guess he is implying some level of confidence in my ability to do so. I think he recommends doing so because a BA in History is kind of hard to use, while getting a Master's lets one use it in Education or something better than using the line, "Would you like fries with that?"</p>

<p>what about a BS in engineering? Is that enough for a good career?</p>

<p>Either for business, or I'll go to law school. Either way, I am expecting seven-eight more years of school (currently a high school senior), and not more than four of those under the position of "undergrad". :)</p>

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I would like to eventually go to graduate school. I have had repeated conversations with my history professor in which he states "when" not "if do your graduate work," so I guess he is implying some level of confidence in my ability to do so. I think he recommends doing so because a BA in History is kind of hard to use, while getting a Master's lets one use it in Education or something better than using the line, "Would you like fries with that?"

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<p>Reminds me of an old printed campus edition of theonion. The history major who ended up working at a hotel was like:</p>

<p>"It's astonishing - from my years at UM I thought I was learning important information. I even got that little paper at the end that said that I was well verse in American history. I was a little shocked when I realized people were much more likely to need a toilet plunger than my thoughts on the Jacksonian period of American history.</p>

<p>is grad school necessary to be competitive for engineering jobs?</p>

<p>
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I was a little shocked when I realized people were much more likely to need a toilet plunger than my thoughts on the Jacksonian period of American history.

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<p>Why? Skilled manual jobs, such as plumbers, electricians and carpenters are in high demand. People need the services that these people provide. With more students yearning for college degrees, it becomes a supply and demand thing. We are losing these manual skills. Why else would a college graduate pay a plumber double time to come on a weekend or holiday to stop the flood eminating from his toilet? I know several people who have these skilled jobs and live better than my family does with 12 years of college education. Hmmm.........</p>

<p>lkf725 - Boy are you right. My brother does heating & airconditioning for new construction and he makes a fortune. Not only does he only work at best 4 hours per day (gets paid for 8) he can then work on the side for extra money. He has been making over $35/hr for 20 years (way more when you factor in side jobs). My husband is a chemist/gen manager who works 10/11 hr days (gets paid for 8 - on salary). Salary is a killer in the white collar world. Doesn't give you any time to work side jobs for extra money because you are exhausted. </p>

<p>The funniest thing is people will tell my brother, "If you come over on the weekend and install this furnace/airconditioner we will pay you $10/hr". They think he gets paid like $7/hr. It makes a good laugh.</p>

<p>In any event we are still putting my son through college and he will most likely end up in grad school (art historian/foreign languages). Do we worry that he will never get a job/money? Yes, but we figure that you should do what you love:)</p>

<p>if do skilled manual jobs, you would work twice as hard as a college grad even if you make more money. a college grad would be sitting in a chair working a computer all day, while your a high school dropout would be slaving over a airconditioner or toilet.</p>

<p>That was an ridiculously uninformed statement. Most skilled workers are not high school dropouts. Many own their own businesses. I've paid repairmen $60 to walk into my house and another $60/hr to use a wrench or a screwdriver for a few minutes. How is this slaving? I think a white collar worker putting in 12 hour days trying to produce and network, only to take more work home with him, is closer to "slaving". Many employees and their families would be happier with a higher salary and less mental/emotional duress, even if it is in a blue collar job.</p>

<p>lkf725 - well said! </p>

<p>xSsJ4s - My brother does not work twice as hard as my husband (EVER!). He puts in a 4 hour day while my husband puts in a 10/11+ day & they both get paid for 8 hours of work. My brother does his job, leaves, and never thinks about his job once he leaves the site. My husband on the other hand, as a general manager, has to worry about what is going on all the time. He can't just leave, and not think about things afterward even thought he is good about leaving work at work most of the time. Not all college grads will be sitting over a computer all day either. As to your original post - NO, I personally do not think a bachelor's is enough anymore. Most of our friends have had to go back and get their masters/PhDs to get promotions. Bachelor's degrees IMHO unfortunately don't mean much today.</p>

<p>As one that slaves over a computer much of the time while taking calls from sometimes unhappy clients and trying to pry information from third parties, I would bet that few with good blue collar jobs wakeup at 4am stressing over deadlines and other factors of corporate life. The only good thing is that like a plumber, I get paid by the job so the more I work the more I make.</p>

<p>Someone can work in my field (commercial real estate finance/consulting) with a BA and make over $100,000 in three or four years. But 2 out of three hires quit because they just can't handle the pressure and detail required.</p>

<p>
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Is having a just bachelors degree enough for a stable well paying career?

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<p>Answer: YES. </p>

<p>Proof: Eli Broad (net worth 6.1 bill)</p>

<p>i still think a bachelors degree(especially the difficult ones like engineering, math, etc., ect.) is quite an acheivement considering alot of people don't even make it out of high school. proof? just look at most of the forbes 100 richest billionaires. most of them don't have anything past a bachelors degree. even the richest one, bill gates.</p>

<p>It was also reported that some of the most selective Ibanks and consulting firms are moving away from MBAs and focusing on BA hires.</p>

<p>(but will invariably send them back for their MBA 4 years later)</p>

<p>I eventually want to get my MS and pHD in chemE, but it'll probably be a while after undergrad just because it's not 100% necesary</p>

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most of them don't have anything past a bachelors degree. even the richest one, bill gates.

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<p>Most of them were also incredibly brilliant, despite the education. They're not rich because of their degrees, they're rich because they're ridiculously smart.</p>

<p>Barrons is right, there was an article in some publication today, was it BW...mot sure....about how companies are getting away from the MBA entirely, just wanting intelligent, analytical, undergrads, who they can train and mold.</p>

<p>I plan to go directly into grad school to get my M.Arch.</p>