Why do some questions get posted here?

<p>During the past few months, many questions have arisen re: the college apps. But rather than posting here, we tend to call the college directly, ask at an info session, ask the GC, etc. For example, when S decided to retake the SAT in Nov. even though he was applying EA, we just called the colleges to see whether they would accept Nov. scores. When we wondered about sending recs to schools that did not require them, or asked for only one, again we just called. Did most applicants send recs? How many were appropriate? Problems with the online app - help was only a phone call away. Worry over an essay that was longer than the recommended length? A phone call assured us that while they didn't want 1000 words, 700 was no problem even though the prompt suggested 500. </p>

<p>"We" was usually me, because between the time change and S's busy days, calling colleges was not often feasible for him. I have always gotten useful, courteous and gracious answers, although some schools did keep me on hold longer than I would have liked. I never asked a question that could be answered on the website or from reading the school's printed materials, so I did not abuse the privilege. I was rarely asked my S's name and never had the feeling his app would in any way be prejudiced because I'd called. While some callers might make themselves obnoxious or call too frequently, and I am sure the schools rightfully hate that, I do think it is better to get a direct, accurate answer rather than to ask some questions here. </p>

<p>Obviously, some applicants may not be able to make a long distance call, and so come here instead. And it would be awkward to ask, for example, about possible interview questions. But for other more straighforward questions, I wonder at why posters seem so reluctant to ask a direct question of the source most likely to give the best answer. Maybe things at the Ivies are different, and so kids are correctly reluctant to call. From my perspective, a helpful and reachable admissions office earns a school points in my book!</p>

<p>Well, I know that for one question I had, I called the admissions office three times and left a message twice and never have gotten a response... and this is at a small LAC. I came here and within and hour I had a reply. </p>

<p>I agree that the answers here should not be taken as concrete, though. Things change and I would hate to make a mistake because I was too lazy to call the admissions office.</p>

<p>I wondered the same thing about the questions that could be found very quickly with a search of the college's admissions site or a google search.</p>

<p>So here's a funny: my d. was trying to schedule an overnight a year ago October at a little college in Mass. The admission dept. got it together, but the student society that was supposed to link applicants up with hosts never called back, despite 3 separate messages, and one e-mail left. Anyhow, when we arrived, the admissions dept. told my d. where to go, and since we knew the place, it wasn't a problem.</p>

<p>Well, about a month ago, my d. got a phone call from the student society to tell her that her visit was now arranged, and gave us the name and the phone number of the student to which she was assigned.</p>

<p>"Obviously, some applicants may not be able to make a long distance call, and so come here instead. And it would be awkward to ask, for example, about possible interview questions. But for other more straighforward questions, I wonder at why posters seem so reluctant to ask a direct question of the source most likely to give the best answer. "</p>

<p>Often one can get a faster answer here than through e-mail. Some students, too, I think are very shy about e-mailing or calling. I think that many have not had experience making business calls.</p>

<p>In the case of questions referring to very specific, personal situations, the inquiring people would be better off going directly to the source by either calling or e-mailing the colleges involved.</p>

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<p>We used email frequently when DS was applying to colleges. We usually had an answer to our question within 24 hours. Now that DS is in college, we (the parents) continue to use email. For example, in the spring the website was a bit unclear re: whether we needed to do an updated Profile for merit aid. We sent an email to the finaid office and had an answer the same day (and could print it out and keep it...just in case). BTW...this is a very large university (30,000 or so).</p>