Worst LSAT score known...

<p>where the person was actually accepted to a law school? What's the magic number?</p>

<p>i bet its under 140. </p>

<p>cooley probably has him or her.</p>

<p>120 is the lowest possible score, i've seen some people with 140s get into schools (Bad schools)</p>

<p>UH Law~</p>

<p>Q: What is the lowest LSAT you will accept?</p>

<p>A: We do not have a set minimum. This year the lowest LSAT we accepted was in the mid 140's. The median was a 161. Accepted applicants with lower LSAT scores tend to have higher GPAs and strong personal statements, letters of recommendation, and work experience/ evidence of leadership.</p>

<p>Q: What is the lowest GPA you will accept?</p>

<p>A: We do not have a set minimum GPA. This year the lowest GPA we accepted was in the 2.30 range. The median was a 3.6. Accepted applicants with lower GPAs tend to have higher LSAT scores and strong personal statements, letters of recommendation, and work experience/ evidence of leadership.</p>

<p>by UH does that mean houston. i can't believe they accepted someone with a 145. </p>

<p>he or she must be a URM, great gpa, great prior work experience.</p>

<p>younghov-</p>

<p>Why would you generalize someone with a 145 LSAT score as an URM? Why can't it be anyone regardless of race/ethnicity?</p>

<p>i don't think its really an issue, i mean URMs are able to get into schools with lower than average LSAT scores. I've heard about a URM girl with a 165 getting into harvard law.</p>

<p>And yeah that's University of Houston younghov.</p>

<p>no offense was intended. </p>

<p>I didn't state that if someone gets a 145, they must be a URM, as you implied. I just stated, if someone received a 145 and was accepted at a school that has a median of 161, an explanation could be URM status.</p>

<p>Being a URM generally gives a significant boost to an applicant's chances of acceptance. No one would argue with that.</p>

<p>We got a URM in to HLS with a 3.6 /155.</p>

<p>that's kind of crazy. because typically, at most, URM status adds 10-12 point to a lsat score, which would be a 167, which would still be lower than the harvard average score. and a 3.6 isn't spectacular for harvard.</p>

<p>"that's kind of crazy. because typically, at most, URM status adds 10-12 point to a lsat score, which would be a 167, which would still be lower than the harvard average score. and a 3.6 isn't spectacular for harvard."</p>

<p>10-12 points, thats rather significant.</p>

<p>Well I just talked to someone last week who said he wasn't happy that he had to take the LSAT again because "Law school don't like when you take it more than once." However...his score when he took it the first time was...139. He hasn't applied anywhere yet, so I don't know how things will work out for him...</p>

<p>yeah, 139 is a bit low. he should def. take it again.</p>

<p>I'm thinking about attending duquense for law school. what's your overall opinion of it (or if anywone else has any opinions of the school, please comment as well)?</p>

<p>I wonder if the recent shootings there might increase the number of applicants.</p>

<p>I was actually looking at Duquense, however even before the recent shootings I had heard the school is in a really rough area. Just something to keep in mind.</p>

<p>I go to Duquesne now for undergrad. Part of the reason why the shooting was so shocking was because despite where it's located, it's VERY safe. Keep in mind that we're on top of a hill, which does keep people away from the campus. They aren't very friendly hills either!!! People have gotten themselves into trouble because they've put themselves in positions where something could happen. It's a safe school, I still think it's a safe school, but it's still in a city, and you do need to be careful and use common sense. </p>

<p>As far as it is as a law school...I know it's ranked rather low on the U.S. News rankings (if you really go by that) but if you're looking to practice in the Pittsburgh area it's a VERY good place to go. It's still a regional school though, so I probably wouldn't recommend it if you're looking to practice outside of that general area. That being said, I heard it's gaining publicity, and it is a school that I'm going to be applying to when I do this next year.</p>

<p>thanks for the info. </p>

<p>yeah, it's a tier 3. regardless, from what i've heard, it has a great reputation in pittsburgh and has very solid job placement stats.</p>

<p>And going to a school in an urban environment is attractive to me (the vast majority of schools seem to be located in smaller cities).</p>

<p>I don't know anything about the law school at Duquesne. But I do know that allena's comment about it being a rough area is false. The Duquesne campus is very isolated from the city although it is adjacent to the downtown area. Public transportation is available on the campus and is safe. In fact for a city campus, Duquesne is very clean, well maintained and has stunning views of the skyline of Pittsburgh.</p>

<p>"URM status adds 10-12 point to a LSAT score"</p>

<p>Actually on the old LSAT scale, URM's were getting a boost between 100 to 150 points at least at the elite schools, and I believe this was discussed in the Grutter case in supporting briefs</p>

<p>That would translate into at least a 18 to 20 point boost on the new LSAT, which is consistent with the earlier poster describing a Harvard Law URM entering with a 155</p>

<p>Some of these URM's are going to be in for a big surprise when they face the multi-state bar exam, a crucial component for a 1st time pass in many jurisidictions - which I believe would correlate with LSAT scores. No one (so far) has figured out how to lower the standards for select "minorities" for the bar exam -and at the same time have no one notice it</p>

<p>"Actually on the old LSAT scale, URM's were getting a boost between 100 to 150 points at least at the elite schools"</p>

<p>To what are you referring? The old LSAT scale was from 10 to 48 points, while the new scale is from 120 to 180 points. How could anyone ever have gotten a 100 to 150 point boost on the LSAT?</p>

<p>200 to 800 scale was once used - at least when I went to law school</p>

<p>and why did they need to change it anyways?</p>