Writing Questions

<p>1)
Western culture has thrived because it values the open inquiry of science< more than the closed dogma> of state religion.</p>

<p>The answer is correct as written. Shoudnt it be 'Science more than it thrived in closed dogma of state' parallelism?</p>

<p>2) Being a popular and well-respected member of the community, Andrea is clearly favored to win the nomination <for representative=""> to the city council.</for></p>

<p>The answer is E, No error. I thought it should be corrected <of representative=""> Idiom.</of></p>

<p>3) Picking the right sentence among two choices..
A.
For instance, one candidate might want to eliminate environmental regulations< for the financial benefit of his industrial supporters, but to the detriment of your asthma and your favorite swimming lake, which are harmed by pollution.>
B.
For instance, one candidate might want to eliminate environmental regulations <for his="" industrial="" supporters'="" wealth,="" but="" you="" have="" asthma="" and="" your="" favorite="" swimming="" lake="" is="" getting="" worse="" because="" of="" pollution.=""></for></p>

<p>A is correct, but i chose B because A to me was a run-on sentence, the independent clause , <but to="" the="" detriment="" of="" your="" asthma="" and="" favorite="" swimming="" lake,="" which="" are="" harmed="" by="" pollution=""> cannot stand alone ( at least in my view).</but></p>

<p>Thanks!</p>

<p>For #3, B is incorrect because it changes from "one" to "you". It has to stay the SAME.</p>

<p>Yeah, but a fragment was more blatant. Can someone explain why A is correct?</p>

<p>Bump......</p>

<p>bump..........</p>

<p>
[quote]
1)
Western culture has thrived because it values the open inquiry of science< more than the closed dogma> of state religion.</p>

<p>The answer is correct as written. Shoudnt it be 'Science more than it thrived in closed dogma of state' parallelism?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to say. The original sentence is parallel.</p>

<p>Western culture has thrived because it values the open inquiry of science more than the closed dogma of state religion.</p>

<p>
[quote]
2) Being a popular and well-respected member of the community, Andrea is clearly favored to win the nomination <for representative=""> to the city council.</for></p>

<p>The answer is E, No error. I thought it should be corrected <of representative=""> Idiom.

[/quote]
</of></p>

<p>In this context, nomination "for" is the correct idiom. Since nomination is an action, the preposition of can follow nomination.</p>

<p>You put "of" after an action in order to indicate something that is acted upon.</p>

<p>the killing of Jane ---> Jane was killed</p>

<p>However, in this particular sentence, "for" is indeed the correct idiom.</p>

<ol>
<li>I think you are correct that A is not a grammatically correct sentence. However, I don't think B is a good sentence. (one -> you)</li>
</ol>

<p>What test is this from?</p>

<p>For question 3 choice A is a horrible excuse for good writing. But it's quite possible that it is grammatically correct.</p>

<p>I've reached that conclusion by first simplifying the sentence to something that approaches good writing:</p>

<p>For instance, one candidate might want to eliminate environmental regulations for the financial benefit of the petrochemical industry but to the detriment of the environment and public health.</p>

<p>Note that this isn't a run-on sentence.</p>

<p>Then replace
"the petrochemical industry" with "his industrial supporters".
The sentence is still correct -- "his" clearly refers to the candidate.</p>

<p>Then (reluctantly) replace "of the environment and public health" with "of your asthma and your favorite swimming lake".</p>

<p>I suppose the sentence is meant to speak to you -- the reader -- and so "your" is acceptable. The sentence is then still correct.</p>

<p>Finally add the clause "which are harmed by pollution". I suppose that the intent is to attach the clause to both your asthma and to your favorite swimming hole. Better is to say that, as for example "both of which are harmed by pollution". Arguably "both" is implies because of the plural "are".</p>

<p>This can't possibly be a CB question. Or perhaps there is a choice "D" and the answer key has a typo.</p>