Your School Is Extremely Elitest/Stuck-Up

<p>I can not believe your school does not accept transfers. I have never heard of a school not accepting transfers. Furthermore, Princeton does not allow students who have taken attended another university (been tainted by them) to even apply as Freshman and start over. It is extremely elitist and snobbish to think they are not good enough for Princeton since they have been touched by another school - I have never heard of another school doing this either. It is a extremely detrimental practice because it restricts the flow of new ideas and perspectives that transfer students bring to universities - it encloses your university in a box. I am a student who was rejected from Princeton out of high school but am now at Georgetown Univ. , a more than reputable school, and have a 4.0 GPA . I deserve a right to apply to transfer to Princeton to at least pitch my case for what I would bring to the university - which I believe is a great deal. What about me makes Princeton not even want me to apply? Someone please tell me.</p>

<p>There there little one... everything will be okay. Don't worry, you've posted on every other school's forum asking about transfer stats, so I'm sure you don't love Princeton THAT much.</p>

<p>Aren't you a bit presumptuous to think that Princeton is being elitist (proper spelling by the way)? Princeton really isn't that big of a school so it does have limitations on its size. If they accept a full class and very few to none leave, do they have space for a transfer? Probably not. They don't have the resources that other schools have.</p>

<p>Edit:
By resources, I mean dorms. They're still renovating a lot of old dorms and the new Whitman college just opened this year. To make another college would take years to determine a budget and set aside land.</p>

<p>What's wrong with Georgetown?</p>

<p>nuttin its cool and im just free lancing here so spellings going to be off </p>

<p>i dont love princeton believe me i just dont understand their policy...</p>

<p>every other school has dorm limitations guys</p>

<p>i'm sorry, but i don't see the connection between "Princeton doesn't accept transfers" and "Princeton is extremely elitist/stuck-up". I am sure that Princeton's rationale in not accepting transfers has nothing to do with the fact that transfers have been "touched" by another school. Perhaps it was this kind of logic that kept you out of Princeton in the first place.</p>

<p>
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I am a student who was rejected from Princeton out of high school but am now at Georgetown Univ. , a more than reputable school, and have a 4.0 GPA .

[/quote]

If Georgetown is more reputable, then why do you want to transfer?</p>

<p>
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What about me makes Princeton not even want me to apply?

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It's an institutional policy, and I doubt they had you specifically in mind when Princeton implemented it.</p>

<p>As others have said, the low dropout rate is what makes transfer admissions an impossibility. Next year, every single bed on campus will be filled due to ongoing construction and demolition. It's not that Princeton isn't interested in you; there's just no room for you.</p>

<p>not more reputable than Princeton, more than reputable... in general</p>

<p>and all schools face the same issues you speak but still give applicants the chance to state their case.. even if they only accept 3 percent of applicants</p>

<p>and also why will they allow you to apply if you didn't go to college for a year but not if you did....even as a freshman?</p>

<p>and the title was mainly to grab your guys attention i don't really think that of y'al , mission accomplished.. but really the fact there isn't space doesn't stop any other school in the country. Is there any discussion of this among the students on campus or are they simply content that they got in...</p>

<p>From your recent threads you seem to have interest in Harvard and Yale which are A LOT bigger than Princeton and yet they accept only a couple dozen students. Yale has about 12 residential colleges and Harvard has 13 while Princeton has 6. </p>

<p>So if Yale takes about 30 transfers, Princeton could take about 15 at most let's say. Now that is further reduced because students Butler and Wilson are placed in temporary rooms to account for the renovation which reduces the possible openings even less. Now that seems like a pretty full class to me.</p>

<p>Your rant, while taking nothing away from Princeton, does a disservice to Georgetown. I am sure they'll be able to spare what you'll bring with you when you transfer someplace.</p>

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Your rant, while taking nothing away from Princeton, does a disservice to Georgetown. I am sure they'll be able to spare what you'll bring with you when you transfer someplace.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>If this isn't stuck up, I don't know what is.</p>

<p>I do, however, find the helpful, non-elitist responses kind of odd. A high retention rate doesn't necessarily mean that there isn't any room for transfers, as is shown by other schools with similar retention rates (e.g. Harvard). (And Harvard really isn't that much bigger than Princeton.) There are also schools that have room for ~10 transfer students a year (e.g., Caltech). Surely, Princeton has room for a few more than that.</p>

<p>i'm really not as confrontational as i first seemed guys - i just thought I would be ignored. I really do love you all and I love georgetown and though I am applying to 4 schools to transfer I do not know if I will even want to leave if given the opp. but that is beside the point.</p>

<p>there are much smaller schools than princeton that offer transfer admissions and this is not a new policy due to construction it has always been this way. There must be some additional reasoning for the policy besides space considering both of these facts.. also has this ever been brought up in the student newspaper or by the student government - it seems like most students would be at least somewhat alarmed at their universities peculiarly limiting transfer admissions policy.</p>

<p>
[quote]
A high retention rate doesn't necessarily mean that there isn't any room for transfers, as is shown by other schools with similar retention rates (e.g. Harvard). (And Harvard really isn't that much bigger than Princeton.) There are also schools that have room for ~10 transfer students a year (e.g., Caltech). Surely, Princeton has room for a few more than that.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Note that retention rate only reflects so much. It doesn't tell you, for example, how many students are studying abroad in a semester or, say, the number of people who take a year off between years. And when 10 or 20 people make the difference between whether the school will accept transfers or not, it's far from inconceivable that inter-school differences/trends between Princeton and Harvard are the reason for differing policies.</p>

<p>Also important is that schools just place priorities on different things. Look at MIT, for example. MIT accepts a handful of transfers each year, yet as it is, the school's dorms are overcrowded. I'm sure that if Princeton decided that this was a tolerable price to pay, then it could also take in a few transfer students. Now, I personally find it laudable that MIT still takes on transfer students, but it's far from obvious that a school should be further crowding its existing students to take on new ones. That is, MIT has one philosophy, Princeton has another. It's not immediately obvious to me that Princeton's (or MIT's) is wrong.</p>

<p>Finally, I should note that the administration wants to be able to take on transfer students. If you look at the Wythes report - the one that sparked the move to increase enrollment and build Whitman - you'll see that a motivation for those actions was to allow the University to open its doors to transfers, which the report recognized as another source of talent. So perhaps in the near future, Princeton will allow transfer applications.</p>

<p>


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<p>If this isn't stuck up, I don't know what is.

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<p>Oh, I don't know. I wouldn't call it stuck up. Harshly stated, maybe. People can be pretty passionate about their school. When someone comes on a board and flings accusations of the place being elitist and stuck up (something most Princeton people are sick of hearing) mostly for the sake of riling up controversy, that's bound to be irksome.</p>

<p>For what it's worth, the OP has apologized, and I don't think he meant to be nasty in any way.</p>

<p>This is all silly anyway; just thought I'd put in my two cents.</p>

<p>Princeton's attrition rate is extraordinarily low, and so rather than waste both applicants' and adcoms' time in encouraging applications only to reject all but 1 or 2 students, they just make the time- and effort-saving policy of not accepting transfer students.</p>

<p>Sorry that it seems elitist; it's not, it's just the best common-sense policy under the circumstances.</p>

<p>Understood and if I could change my original post/title at this point I would but I think transfer students are something Princeton is/definately should be looking into the future, their current policy while I am starting to understand some of the reasons for it - seems a bit regressive in a day when transfers and kids finding the school that is right for them is more common than ever.</p>

<p>Yes, it seems institutions need to adapt to the modern custom of people making decisions and not sticking to them.</p>

<p>I've always wondered why Princeton didn't accept transfers, too, and here's what I've found on Yahoo! Answers:


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<p>I have always assumed, with of course absolutely zero data, that it was in part because so few kids, comparably, take semesters or years and go elsewhere. The junior papers make the junior year abroad thing less appealing, and many kids, who thought they wanted to go away, honestly get to Princeton and think - "Why would I leave?"</p>