Educating for the Jobs of the 21st Century

<p>Detroit’s</a> Schools Offer New Class: Working at Wal-Mart</p>

<p>Detroit has a 50% unemployment rate even after all that money was redirected to the auto industry to bail it out? I had no idea. I thought that at least in Motor City there was a propped up recovery of some sort. So sad... :(</p>

<p>Detroit's official unemployment rate, the one the federal government reports, is about 28%. The 50% figure includes estimates of so-called underemployed people (working part-time because they can't find full-time jobs) and people who are out of work but no longer looking (presumably because it seems pointless to look for jobs where there are none).</p>

<p>Auto industry jobs still require skills, and if the residents of Detroit don't have those skills, no amount of money poured into the auto industry will increase employment there. Plus, not much actual manufacturing takes place in Detroit itself; it's spread out all over the Great Lakes area and, increasingly, the South. Detroit is called the Motor City because the big three automakers are headquartered there, not because many cars are actually made there.</p>

<p>Anyway, I'm sure they're not redirecting kids from AP Calculus into Wal-Mart 101. And Wal-Mart, for all the grief they get (and deserve) for being a mega-corporate monster, also puts tons of money into education. At least somebody is doing that.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Detroit's official unemployment rate, the one the federal government reports, is about 28%. The 50% figure includes estimates of so-called underemployed people (working part-time because they can't find full-time jobs) and people who are out of work but no longer looking (presumably because it seems pointless to look for jobs where there are none).

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Leave it to government officials to come up with whatever number fits the narrative du jour. Abysmal numbers are presented when there is a need to justify funding; glossy numbers to "show" the positive results of more funding. Then it is rinse and repeat!</p>

<p>Compare the numbers of graduating HSers in Detroit public schools. If one methodology does not yield the expected numbers, the simplest solution is to change how you add the numbers up! </p>

<p>Detroit</a> Schools Graduation Rate: 32%</p>

<p>"Just 31.9 percent of Detroit students graduate in four years, according to the first major study in Michigan conducted using a method now mandated by the federal government."</p>

<p>"According to the state Department of Education, the district's graduation rate for the same time frame was 66.8 percent." </p>

<p>More numbers at
USATODAY.com</a> - Big-city schools struggle with graduation rates</p>

<p>mini, your thread title tricked me! I thought this thread would was gonna be the latest installment in our ongoing STEM v. LA saga. ;)</p>

<p>^ It is just a matter of time. How about a little side be on the # of posts before it's locked? I'm going with 70 with 40% of the posts by the same person.</p>

<p>Well, look at the bright side. By planting seeds in Detroit, WalMart might places itself in the pole position line for the next rounds of bailout money. </p>

<p>This said, it is extremely doubtful that the lesson written on the blackboard (actually green) will be quite popular in a town dominated (and decapitated) by the UAW.</p>

<p>Except that the UAW membership never lived much into the inner city the last 30+ years... I spent a few years working for the auto industry in Detroit (suburbs) and there were few autoworkers left in Detroit city proper even back then. Most had moved either north (Warren, Utica, etc), West (Southfield, etc) or South (Dearborn, etc)</p>

<p>To be even more blunt, much of the plight of Detroit was caused by blue collar fleeing the city in the 50's and 60's, and then even as the job cuts began in the 70's.</p>

<p>I think there is urban, suburban gaps in high school graduation rate all over USA except few places like San Jose, San Deigo, and Pheonix etc.</p>

<p>'Crisis</a>' graduation gap found between cities, suburbs - USATODAY.com</p>

<p>Wasn't that by design?</p>

<p>Yes, that seems to be the case because the suburban graduation rate differ from a min of 61% in Atlanta to 87% in Omaha.</p>

<p>But on the otherhand the urban graduation rate differe from a min of 35% in Baltimore to 81% in San Jose.</p>

<p>It's all related to the demographics of the population/income. San Jose boast of a highly educated population, lowest crime rate, and highest average/median income among the large cities. </p>

<p>Most urban areas are not like that including the close by Oakland and San Francisco.</p>

<p>"mini, your thread title tricked me! I thought this thread would was gonna be the latest installment in our ongoing STEM v. LA saga"</p>

<p>We can (and are) shipping all those STEM jobs abroad, where there are highly competent, well-trained engineers and computer specialists ready, able, and willing.</p>

<p>The future is in Wal-Mart clerks. Great that Detroit is getting a head start.</p>

<p>And, after we have shipped all the STEM jobs to Elbonia, like we did the manufacturing jobs a while back, what then?</p>

<p>The article is close to two years old. Any progress reports?</p>

<p>"And, after we have shipped all the STEM jobs to Elbonia, like we did the manufacturing jobs a while back, what then?"</p>

<p>Retraining. Wal-Mart is waiting.</p>

<p>I am sitting here one hour south of Chennai. It seems every third block there is a college of engineering and technology. Some of them are lousy, some of them are extraordinary, most in-between (rather like the U.S.) Students pay up to $70,000 just for the right of admission (not costs of attendance, just for admission). Families go into total hock to do it. So the students work HARD.</p>

<p>Yesterday, I drove six hours with a 20-year-old Hampshire College student. Her family, after living in Toronto for 17 years, has moved back to Chennai. Father runs a software company, and found that he could get better staff here (at less cost) to serve his primarily Canadian, but worldwide clientele. He is expanding rapidly. Bought a two million-dollar house near the beach. He says many of his friends are now moving back, and bringing the jobs with them.</p>

<p>So who are all the Indians coming to the US for school, if it's so great in India?</p>

<p>How's the infrastructure, health and human services, and human rights?</p>

<p>Schools are cheaper for many Indians in the U.S. than in India. And the best schools, like IIT, are far, far harder to get into than HYPSM. Infrastructure is lousy - well, not totally - the Indian rails, and bus services, are far more readily available than in the U.S. Human rights likely better than the U.S. - fewer people in prisons, no guns, and an "activist" supreme court that goes out of its way proactively to protect. </p>

<p>No argument that "it's so great here". The question is about jobs for the 21st Century. And the answer is - Wal-Mart clerks. The U.S. Department of Labor says service clerks and hamburger flippers are where the jobs of the future are.</p>

<p>I'm sure that Silicon Valley will have something to say about it. And Dc and the Feds.</p>

<p>Walmart is getting involved in green energy in the US and other things, so they will have more other than walmart greeters. There isn't enough money in slaves.</p>

<p>Everybody is so afraid of Walmart. Why? It is the fear of becoming a Walmart greeter.</p>

<p>There are always other options.</p>