First Year Writing Requirement

<p>I read on the UVA website that a score of 720 or higher on the SAT Writing section grants exemption from the first year writing requiremenent. Since I've met this requirement, should I definitely not take my AP Lang exam? Will I get the same credit from my SAT score, no strings attached?</p>

<p>Research the difference between exemption from a requirement vs. getting college credits towards your degree. For example, if you test out of the foreign language requirement, you don't automatically get any college credits for it.</p>

<p>Most students take English Language in 11th grade and then Literature in 12th. The English Language is the one that matches up with ENWR 1510. So double check if you already took the Language AP. If you did and scored a 5 you are exempt from 1510 and you receive 3 college units of credit. </p>

<p>English (Language) 5 3 credits earned for ENWR 1510
English (Literature) 4 or 5 3 credits earned for ENGL 1000T</p>

<p>For your 12th grade Literature course it makes sense to take the AP because for $87 you may end up with 3 college credits if you score a 4 or 5 which at UVa would be $924.</p>

<p>If you have not taken English Language as of yet (which I would be surprised) then I would still take the exam for the college credits. </p>

<p>Hope this helps!</p>

<p>"If you have not taken English Language as of yet (which I would be surprised) then I would still take the exam for the college credits. "</p>

<p>So does the 720 or higher score on the writing section just exempt you from the 1st yr writing req without getting you 3 credits for the course, or do you have to get the 5 on the AP Lang to get both exempted and credit?</p>

<p>
[quote]
do you have to get the 5 on the AP Lang to get both exempted and credit?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Exactly, you have to have both. </p>

<p>Here is for the exemption:
You are automatically exempt from the first writing requirement if at least one of the following statements is true:
a. You are an Echols scholar.
b. You scored 720 or above on the writing portion of the SAT exam.
c. You scored a 5 on the AP English language subject test.</p>

<p>The 720 only gets you an exemption from the course with no credit from UVa. </p>

<p>Here is for the credit:
English (Language) 5 3 credits earned for ENWR 1510</p>

<p>^^^ I don't quite get the difference. To me, being exempted means you get credit for it.</p>

<p>Thanks for clarifying; I didn't realize it wasn't actually a credit. Now if I were to get a 5 on AP Lang and secure the ENWR 1510 credits, what would those be worth? I'm reading here that 1510 doesn't actually fulfill the humanities area requirement: Area</a> Requirements | The Undergraduate College of Arts & Sciences, U.Va.</p>

<p>To tmetzg:
[quote]
Now if I were to get a 5 on AP Lang and secure the ENWR 1510 credits, what would those be worth?

[/quote]

3 UVa credits on your transcript and you are exempt from ENWR 1510 which is one of your distribution requirements-so it is worth your time too because you can take another course. As far as the person paying the bill it is nice because 3 UVa credits is the equivalent of $924 ($308 per credit hour). </p>

<p>1510 would not fulfill the humanities because it fulfills the First Writing and you cannot double dip. Many, many other courses fulfills the humanities requirement. </p>

<p>To TV4Caster: SAT scores would never get you college credit. AP courses and Dual Enrollment are actual college level courses that if certain levels of competency are met you are afforded college credits. For AP courses those competencies are measured by the score you receive on the AP exam. Does this clarify it?</p>

<p>Right now I'm shooting for McIntire, and it looks like their writing prerequisite can be exempted from just like the first year requirement. In this case, would I ever need the actual ENWR 1510 credits?</p>

<p>You would not.</p>

<p>Awesome. Thanks so much, you've been really helpful!</p>

<p>woosah- I understand the AP part of things. What strikes me as odd is that you would be exempted from taking a course and not get credit for. What good does not taking it do you if you have to take an even higher level course to get those credits?</p>

<p>TV -- the benefit of being exempted from a class, even if you don't get credit for that class, is freeing up your schedule to take something you are likely more interested in. The College of Arts and Sciences at UVa has a handful of subjects it demands all students demonstrate competency in. One is college freshman level English composition, another is foreign language (through 4 college semesters). If you earn exemption from any of these requirements other than through AP credits (i.e., though a college-level course and test) you don't have to take the classes at UVa, but you don't earn the college credit attendant to them, either.</p>

<p>Thanks. I figured that's what it had to be but it still seemed odd to say that someone is proficient in something to the point they don't need to take the course, just like I find it odd that UVA doesn't accept 4s on AP English tests like other very selective institutions. At W&M for example, a 4 in Language gets you credit for freshman English.</p>