Five points away from a 90.00/A in AP Calc AB

<p>First semester just ended...and I ended up with all A's BUT with AP Calc AB. I am literally five points away from a 90.00, or an A on my school's grading scale, at an 89.72%. I asked my teacher to round (he has in the past), but he told me 'no.' Should I ask him again? My situation with AP Calc AB was a different one than with most students -- I had a schedule conflict with AP Calc AB, Physics, and Tennis, and I ended up having to open up AP Calc AB as an independent section (basically formal self-study class), or risk not taking Physics (I need to take AP Physics in senior year) and Tennis (varsity). He told me that it was my fault and my choice to do that --- not really, though, I was forced by a schedule conflict to do so, and a student has got to do what he or she has got to do for college in these extremely competitive times. He also told me in the real world, for example, when you pay taxes or your bills and you are late, then you are late. I understand where he is coming from and I don't feel entitled at all that he should round my grade...although with the due circumstances I was put in, 5 points is literally 1 or 2 careless mistakes on a test. Should I approach him again asking? Or e-mail, rather, so I can explicate myself more coherently and thoroughly?</p>

<p>If he already said no, he won't change his mind just because you ask again.</p>

<p>Well when I first talked to him, I didn't really use pathos to touch his heart -- that is, with college admissions, the fact that I had a lot on my plate, learned everything by myself, etc. Plus when my friend asked him to round last year, he said no to her but ended up rounding later when he sent out grades, so I don't think he's incapable of being susceptible to any influences that would change his mind.</p>

<p>I would ask again. This same thing happened to me, actually. I work two jobs to help support my family. My teacher refused to round me up after getting an 89.8 in Spanish. She said no but when I told her about the jobs and started bawling the second time I asked she freaked and gave me an A. It was awkward but worth it lololol.</p>

<p>Working two jobs to support your family is different than wanting to play tennis, alwaysleah. I think you were justified in your begging, the OP not so much.</p>

<p>Yes, it is different. But at the same time, it's still a similiar time commitment. OP worked hard and didn't even have much guidance while learning the material. The worst that can happen is the teacher says no again.</p>

<p>No offense, but you didn't get the A. What makes you think you deserve it?
I have an A- in Calc AB by literally one point. I'm not going to ask for a raise, because it was my fault for my own mistakes. Accept this-- I doubt in college you're going to get straight As.</p>

<p>So many students in my class missed an A by a couple points that the teacher had to address this issue. In her opinion, the students who get A's are the ones who are consistent and confident in their abilities. One bad test can hurt you (I have 95+ on all my tests, except for one 75... see?), and one bad test in college will hurt you. That's why there are set guidelines for grades. You get what you get and you don't throw a fit.</p>

<p>The worst kinds of students are the ones who bicker over every point when every point off is their own doing. Just accept it and move along.</p>

<p>Lols ok....so I guess I shouldn't talk to him again then...it was worth a try asking him though...I'll just try harder next time. I think I might self-study BC to neutralize the B+, and it won't be that bad because the pace of his class is so fast that he's already finished the AB curriculum (this teacher has a 100% pass rate with 80% of them being 5's lols)...woot Taylor Series here I come @_@</p>

<p>As for college admissions prospects, since I will be applying to top schools such as HSM, should I include, in the Additional Info section, AP Calc AB with the other self-studied APs I have as Independent Studies courses, albeit that AP Calc AB had a formal class section made out of it?</p>