For Moms Only -Need advice

<p>Has anyone had surgery for urinary incontinence ? I am 58, and had 4 kids . In the past 2 months I seem to have gotten worse . Today I had an episode of bowel in continence at the grocery store , and am totally freaked out ! Made a couple of doctor appointments today . Anyone had this experience ,or are most of you a lot younger and not there yet ?</p>

<p>I haven't but I adopted so. However, I have had several friends who have needed surgery for that problem.</p>

<p>What were the experiences of your friends ? I have heard that the surgery can lead to permanent incontinence, which is why I haven't done anything yet . Is this outpatient ,or in ?</p>

<p>I haven't had surgery for incontinence, and would be disinclined to do so given the high probability of a poor outcome (for me - not necessarily for anyone else) due to post-op problems I've had with nearly every other operation I've had. If you haven't read it already, you might find the Mayo Clinic's info on incontinence helpful. Mayo appears to view surgery as a last resort, which was the feedback I got from doctors at a local university hospital. There are injections and medications that your doctor may want to try, if not at first then after you've tried some other ways to deal with the problem.</p>

<p>I have IBS-D which, due to some lower GI tract problems, turned me into a bit of a hermit. Some lifestyle modifications do help, such as reducing or eliminating alcohol, caffeine, acidic fruits/juices, and very spicy foods; taking a probiotic supplement such as Align; and doing Kegel exercises (good for both types of incontinence.) Aside from the Align, those are also actions that can help with urinary incontinence.</p>

<p>I also take a Rx that combines anti-spasmodic and anti-anxiety drugs. Finally, I wear protective briefs whenever I leave the house. Taking that last step was somewhat demoralizing since I associate them with nursing home patients who are at least 30 years older. However, it's a lot worse to remain housebound out of fear of an accident.</p>

<p>Best of luck. My guess is that in a few months (or less) you'll be doing much better.</p>

<p>Fauxmaven, go to Hystersisters dot com. They have a separate forum for pelvic floor and bladder issues. They also have a wealth of information on bladder and rectal prolapse. Many women over there experiencing the same thing. I recently had a hysterectomy and that forum has been my lifeline. Good luck.</p>

<p>I would also be concerned how urinary incontinence led to bowel incontinence in someone relatively young and active like yourself.</p>

<p>I hope you can find out what is going on and get it taken care of.</p>

<p>^Actually, I have known quite a few women in their 50's who have had this problem. Childbirth, menopause, genetics, hysterectomy, aging are all things that contribute to it. It's caused by the collapse of the walls of the vagina. Not unusual at all.</p>

<p>I have a friend who is only 38 ( with two kids under the age of 10) who has some bladder incontinence issues.</p>

<p>Are you having bladder problems or bowel problems? They are different.</p>

<p>Are you having any kind of orthopedic issues? I work with a lot of orthopedists/neurosurgeons, and they always seem to ask the patients if they have bowel or bladder problems. You may want to check out that area, as well as the female area. Good luck!</p>

<p>My sister has had six pregnancies, with four living children, including a set of twins. She has lupus and thyroid problems, but tells me she has developed urinary incontinence over the past couple of years as well. Her twins are 10 years old, the youngest children.</p>

<p>fauxmaven, none of my friends had any negative reactions from their surgery.</p>

<p>I had surgery for urinary incontinence. A bladder "sling" was put in. I am very happy and would reccomend it to anyone. No one should have to live that way. (I'm not sure about your bowel occurance) Mine was stress incontinence (sneezing, coughing etc.) I would at least see the urologist. You don't have to go through with the surgery. My gyn said to do keogels and apply estrogen cream. Sorry, but that is not enough when you are wetting yourself or crossing your legs!</p>

<p>After the surgery you are not allowed to lift for 6 weeks even though you feel great right away. That is the hardest part.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Are you having any kind of orthopedic issues? I work with a lot of orthopedists/neurosurgeons, and they always seem to ask the patients if they have bowel or bladder problems. You may want to check out that area, as well as the female area. Good luck!

[/quote]
</p>

<p>There is a serious byproduct of herniated discs and other orthopedic/neurologic/inflammatory conditions called "cauda equina syndrome." The result may be fecal incontinence and if often considered a medical emergency requiring immediate surgery. This is why neurologists and orthopedic doctors often ask low back pain patients if they have experienced urinary incontinence, anal numbness, or fecal incontinence.</p>

<p>Cauda</a> equina syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</p>

<p>
[quote]
There is a serious byproduct of herniated discs and other orthopedic/neurologic/inflammatory conditions called "cauda equina syndrome." The result may be fecal incontinence and if often considered a medical emergency requiring immediate surgery. This is why neurologists and orthopedic doctors often ask low back pain patients if they have experienced urinary incontinence, anal numbness, or fecal incontinence.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Additionally, one can have another condition like bladder cancer and the pain can be referred (meaning felt in another place) to the pelvis. It can be experienced, for example, as hip pain or flank pain (flank area is over the kidney area, which would be the upper part of the lower back).</p>

<p>My GYN said that reducing/eliminating caffeine will help with the urinary incontinence. Caffeine can irritate the bladder. She said drink lots of water, and ironically, one won't need to go as often. I have found this to be the case.</p>

<p>another recommendation for hystersisters.com. I found it extremely valuable about 10 years ago when I had a hysterectomy. Lots of wonderful advice and guidance.</p>

<p>Hi- I only drink coffee 1 or2 times a week .The urinary thing has been going on for some time , the bowel thing has happened 1 or 2 times in the last 2 months . I am seeing my 2 doctors on Mon and Fri- will see what happens . Is this sling done out patient ? Will look at Hystersisters -thanks to all !</p>

<p>My procedure was outpatient. (Done in the hospital, but you go home after.) Off work for a week (maybe 2?), no housework for 6 weeks.</p>

<p>I was scheduled for surgery last month but had to postpone for work reasons. I am calling tomorrow to set it up.</p>

<p>I have had 5 deliveries, 3 vaginal. I have stress incontinence when I sneeze or cough. My uro doc says stress incon is easiest to handle by a sling. Urge incon is a bit different. I am also lucky not to have cysto or rectoceles.</p>

<p>My friend had the surgery years ago and loves it She was off work for 6 weeks because she did have other issues.</p>

<p>I will be out of work for 3 days (my doc does surgery on Fridays for working women), then in office for 2 weeks. I don't do housework anyway. H is a stay at home.</p>

<p>I realized I needed it when I realized my 90 year old aunt has better bladder control - of course, she is childless.</p>

<p>I can't wait till I can stop wearing Poise pads.</p>

<p>Fauxmaven, I've known folk with these issues but most have had more than two full term pregnancies...you only have two kids, right?</p>

<p>I would head to my doctor and tell him/her your symptoms. I'm not a doctor, but maybe you have two different issues going on here.</p>