Gores splitting up?

<p>No reasons given as to why in the emailed announcement.</p>

<p>surprising news yes </p>

<p>Reports:</a> Al And Tipper Gore To Split Up After 40 Years Of Marriage : NPR</p>

<p>I know their children are adults now, but for their sake I hope the Gore's divorce remains civil.</p>

<p>This is a surprise. They just bought an $8 million dollar home in Montecito, California.</p>

<p>Is this technically Elections & Politics material? The other politician divorce threads went into the regular Parent Cafe, I think.</p>

<p>Well, so much for that big, long, slobbery kiss at the 2000 Dem convention--re-enacted later on SNL.</p>

<p>Maybe all the work on global warming produced a big chill.</p>

<p>Quite possibly, cartera! ... Why is it I seem to get personally offended whenever a long-time marriage like this fails?</p>

<p>It is sad. I hope they have done some work and made some effort to make it work, but if there is truly no joy left in the marriage, then they should do the right thing and separate, rather than go outside the marriage. Of course, I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt by assuming neither has.</p>

<p>The thing I don't get is the "friendship" factor. My husband and I have been married 24 years. While I love him very much, by far the most important aspect of our partnership is the profound friendship we've developed over the years--that we just really, really enjoy being together, going places together, etc. We share a history together ... a family together. It's not all hearts and roses, champagne and flowers anymore--just a companionable happiness. Where does THAT go? How does one fall out of LIKE with a spouse after 40 years? It really does make me feel sad.</p>

<p>I am very much shocked by this. I was never a supporter of Al Gore, but I truly did think the Gores had a good, loving, and strong marriage.</p>

<p>I hope that the separation is not permanent.</p>

<p>Personally, I think this separation is George W. Bush's fault. Or, Obama's. Take your pick.</p>

<p>He's on the board of directors for at least two large Silicon Valley companies and has his hands in several other companies. I'd guess that he's a very busy guy and that he travels a lot and there's your separation. There's also the stress and strain of a very public life and he's certainly put himself in the center of controversy. Still, if you've made it for 40 years, what's the problem with finishing out the race?</p>

<p>^^^</p>

<p>I agree.</p>

<p>Once you've shared so much time together, your history includes each other. </p>

<p>I know their kids are grown, but I can imagine that they're upset over this, too. No one wants their parents splitting (unless there's abuse, which I doubt in this case.)</p>

<p>I will still hope that this is just a temporary thing.</p>

<p>*Personally, I think this separation is George W. Bush's fault. Or, Obama's. Take your pick. *</p>

<p>Ha ha.... LOL</p>

<p>
[quote]
Still, if you've made it for 40 years, what's the problem with finishing out the race?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>No kidding, BCEagle. After 40 years of marriage--unless life together has become completely intolerable/painful--why not put in some extra effort to try to go the distance? I just don't buy that "we've grown apart" line. It's too easy. It takes love, energy, and serious commitment to actually grow old with someone. Not every marriage is fated to last, but sometimes I wonder if people let go too easily, just give up and walk away when they should be fighting for something.</p>

<p>I know a few couples that made it to 50 years, but one partner in each relationship wishes they had gotten out "earlier". One couple has since passed on, the other one, in their 80's. </p>

<p>They too believed that they could work it out. But there is/was a sadness, there. I wonder what each would have done if they had split? Would they have been happier, or at a permanent loss without their life partner? </p>

<p>Infidelity, aside...what would be something that would make a long term marriage partner want to leave? Living two separate lives might very well be one of the easy ones. Hard to stay close when you have different lives and interests. </p>

<p>Being a political spouse would be even more pressure than a regular person. They have lived their marriage in public for most of their married lives. That would be tough. </p>

<p>I wish them the best.</p>

<p>As always, Samurai, very good points. ... Still, it makes me sad. Forty years gone. How much life left ahead? How could one really want to start all over again in their mid-to-late '60s, especially when they seemed, at one point, to have a great marriage? But, then, no one on the outside really knows what goes on inside another's marriage.</p>

<p>Yeah, it makes me sad, too.</p>

<p>But we scored with some good ones, didn't we? :D</p>

<p>I know a few couples that made it to 50 years, but **one partner in each relationship wishes they had gotten out "earlier"*. One couple has since passed on, the other one, in their 80's.</p>

<p>They too believed that they could work it out. But there is/was a sadness, there. I wonder what each would have done if they had split? Would they have been happier, or at a permanent loss without their life partner? *</p>

<p>Unless there was abuse or something horrid going on, I think some who may have "wanted to get out earlier" would not necessarily have been happier if they had. People rarely consider all the "fall out" associated with divorce - economic downfall from splitting assets and attorney fees, the frequency that one person can still end up with the "short end of the stick", the pain of seeing your ex with another, the underestimating how your children will be affected, etc. </p>

<p>It's too easy for someone who's been married for 50 years to say, "oh, I should have gotten out earlier." Who knows how much real, deep thought the person has put into that.</p>

<p>Sometimes, people think the grass will be greener, but it ends up being short-lived</p>

<p>We did, indeed. ... But, on our end, it hasn't always been easy. We've had to work so hard to keep things going, and there were times--especially during the early years--when it seemed almost impossible. The fact is, everyone has their problems, to a greater or lesser extent. It takes commitment on both sides to overcome them, and it's a process that continues from marriage day to final breath.</p>