international transfer after sophomore

<p>hey guys!</p>

<p>so I have this question. i just finished my sophomore year in an university in eastern europe (2 out of 3 years). the next year, i'll be an exchange student in an american university. it is a non-degree program. then i'll have to come back to my home country.</p>

<p>do you think i could apply during this exchange year to an american university and so i could get an american degree?</p>

<p>I am confused as to what exactly you are trying to do:</p>

<ul>
<li><p>Do the exchange year, go back to your home university, later come back to the US and get a degree from an American university.</p></li>
<li><p>Do the exchange year, apply to American universities while there, attend another American university after your exchange year and get your degree.</p></li>
<li><p>Do the exchange year and get a degree from an American university w/o further schooling after the exchange.</p></li>
</ul>

<p>Could you clarify? Also, do you expect your visa to have a restriction saying that you will need to be physically present in your home country for two years after the exchange year before coming back to the US?</p>

<p>I guess you can apply as an international transfer student but as to "converting" your exchange student status to a regular student, I would say definitiv not. As an exchange student, you are not really admitted to the US university. Your home university merely has an agreement with the US university allowing you to stuying at the US university for a year while a US student can take your place at your home university. Maybe the fact that you've studied in the US is a plus but it's not going to guarantee you admissions.</p>

<p>b@r!um,
u explained it a lot better than i did.</p>

<ul>
<li>Do the exchange year, apply to American universities while there, attend another American university after your exchange year and get your degree.</li>
</ul>

<p>So now the questions are:
- can I apply if I already finished my sophomore year? (2nd out of 3 years)
- will the universities even allow me to apply?
- after the exchange year is over, should i go back to my home-country, finish the 3rd year, graduate and apply for a master degree?</p>

<p>i'll have a J1 visa on the exchange program, with the 2 year home stay restriction. but the restriction only applies to a person who wants permanent residence or immigrant status. if i'm admitted to a university, i can get the F1 visa, but i'll still have to fulfill the 2 years residence later.</p>

<p>Yes, you could apply as a transfer student to other American universities during your exchange year. However, there are two issues that you need to be aware of:</p>

<ul>
<li><p>American universities have general education requirements. College students have to take courses in English, history, foreign languages, math, science, etc in addition to their major in order to get a degree. As a transfer student from a European university, you are probably well-advanced in your major but have not taken any gen ed courses yet. If you transfered to an American university, you would spend a year just catching up on general education requirements which have nothing to do with your major at all.</p></li>
<li><p>College tuition can be pretty high and there is little financial aid for international transfer students. Do you have $30,000 to $50,000 available to pay for one year of tuition and living expenses at an American university? (Exchange students often get their tuition waived through a reciprocal agreement or a TA position. Regular undergraduate students don't.)</p></li>
</ul>

<p>It might indeed be better, academically as well as financially, to finish your undergraduate degree in Europe and then apply to American Master's program. Or maybe even an American PhD program for that matter. Academically, the reason is that you would not have to complete the general education requirements for an American undergraduate degree. Financially, international graduate students have more options than undergraduate students.</p>

<p>PhDs are fully funded in most fields. Graduate students might get a Teaching or Research Assistantship that pays a modest salary in addition to a tuition waiver. (By the way, American PhD programs admit students with a Bachelor's degree. Students can earn a Master's degree while enrolled in a PhD program.)</p>

<p>Master's programs typically provide less funding than PhD programs, but there is often some financial aid available as well, often in the form a (partial) tuition waiver.</p>

<p>You definitely could transfer and could change your status from exchange to regular. It's hard and it depends on the agreement your school has with the school in the U.S.</p>

<p>My Ghanaian friend who came to my school on an exchange program had to go back cos her school did not allow her to stay after her program ended. Whereas some Irish girls in my school stayed after their exchange program because their university back home didn't care.</p>

<p>I would advise that you come here for your masters degree because although you could transfer, it's not a good idea. Like someone said, in the U.S, there are tons of gen eds, and although you're a transfer student, you will be required to do all the gen-eds (the ones you have already done back home will be crossed off). </p>

<p>The gen-eds nonsense doesn't allow affect international students. A friend of mine transferred from California to my school and this also affected her cos her former school had different gen-ed requirements. </p>

<p>Gen-eds take years to complete. So at the end of the day, you might have 1-2 additional years than you'd normally have. You could take summer classes to get rid of some classes, but you will definitely not graduate after 4 years. Maybe 5-6.</p>

<p>I suggest you come to the U.S. for grad school.</p>

<p>Errrm. . . dont let Femiluv feed you with misinformation. He is a troll.</p>

<p>"I would advise that you come here for your masters degree because although you could transfer, it's not a good idea. Like someone said, in the U.S, there are tons of gen eds, and although you're a transfer student, you will be required to do all the gen-eds (the ones you have already done back home will be crossed off)." </p>

<p>Please check with the school you want to transfer to first what you can do. International transfers are possible but very hard and rare. I had a friend from the Czech republic (East Europe) and he transferred as a junior into college in the US, and he finished in 2 years. Infact he got into Cambridge and LSE for his MPhil.</p>

<p>Also some schools cut down on the general education requirements if you are a transfer. </p>

<p>"You definitely could transfer and could change your status from exchange to regular. It's hard and it depends on the agreement your school has with the school in the U.S."</p>

<p>Thats not how it works. For someone who "goes" to school in the US you are making inane claims. </p>

<p>@ OP</p>

<p>You find out which schools accept International transfer because most dont. Then find out how much of your coursework gets transferred.</p>

<p>"My Ghanaian friend who came to my school on an exchange program had to go back cos her school did not allow her to stay after her program ended. Whereas some Irish girls in my school stayed after their exchange program because their university back home didn't care."</p>

<p>Do more research then come back and troll. It does not work that way :/</p>

<p>@ OP</p>

<p>Please take the advise most have proferred- finish your degree and apply for graduate school in the US or just stay in Eastern Europe. I dont think the stress is sworth that much.</p>

<p>I tend to agree with Femiluv here. </p>

<p>femago, why do you think most American universities don't accept foreign transfer students? They most definitely do! The OP's exchange university may or may not consider visiting students for transfer admission, but the OP can apply elsewhere.</p>

<p>You might help the OP by listing the universities you know which waive some of the gen ed requirements for transfer students. This is so rare that any pointer might be appreciated! (I just checked the policies of 7 universities and liberal arts colleges in the Philadelphia area and not a single one of them reduced the academic requirements. Some adjusted PE requirements or minimum-credits-earned-in-residence thresholds, but they all seemed to expect their transfer students to complete the regular gen ed requirements.)</p>

<p>@ sefago
You are waaay wrong on that. International transfers are certainly not hard or rare. If a student studied in a university that is accredited back home and they succeed in having their transcript evaluated by WES, or any other body . . . that's it. There's nothing complicated about that.</p>

<p>LOL, this is sooo gay. I am definitely not searching online for schools that waive the gen eds- I bet you checked UPenn, Haverford, Swarthmore, Bryn mawr maybe a couple of state schools. </p>

<p>@OP
It depends on the school you want to go to, and check there transfer policies. There are so many schools in the US. Also the gen ed requirement is always 1 year of school work. It does not significantly affect how much time you stay though. </p>

<p>They say they do on their sites doesn't mean they do all the time. These are twodiffeent things. Anyways I get things muddled up. I usually talk of top schools as in Top 10 liberal arts or top 25 unis which rarely even have spaces for American transfers not to talk of internationals.</p>

<p>Well, you were claiming that some universities waive gen ed requirements for transfer students. Can you give us a single example? Because in my own opinion that's blatantly false, but I didn't want to be quite as confrontational in my earlier post.</p>

<p>And why yes, I did check the Quaker Consortium schools. I also checked Temple, Saint John's, the University of Pittsburgh and Penn State (well, not exactly Philadelphia area but in PA). There was going to be a selection bias no matter what, so I figured I would choose universities by geographic location instead of taking the first college that came to mind.</p>

<p>This is what I said:Also some schools cut down on the general education requirements if you are a transfer. </p>

<p>Check Ramapo college. Check transfer policies- I dont even know where this is located
Ramapo</a> College of New Jersey || Center for Academic Advisement / First Year Experience</p>

<p>They are rare, but I think some leeway can be gotten on the gen eds. My school is very strict on gen eds but I dodged a lot of them lol because I majored in the sciences.</p>

<p>^ That's what I was looking for. Thanks. :) (I am learning new things about the admission process every day!)</p>

<p>You said that one year's worth of gen ed requirements would not significantly affect the time to a degree. I will disagree <em>in this case</em> because the OP would have already completed three years of college by the time he transfers. Gen ed requirements might make the difference between 1 and 2 more years, which at $30,000 a year seems significant.</p>

<p>Some school's also have placement exams in which transfer students might be allowed to take especially for math requirements or language requirements. There are so many ways to get out of the gen ed requirements. I did only 75% of my gen eds in college, and dodged the rest finishing in 3.5 years. And I focused on my major for most of those 3.5 years taking several graduate classes and doing research internships.</p>

<p>OP you should just research the schools you want to go to.</p>

<p>Anyways I would not support the OP from transferring as I said earlier in my posts. Except he has good reasons to.</p>

<p>thanks everyone for replies.
as b@r!um said, attendance costs will be something i will not be able to cover.
as far as I know, there are also not too many universities that offer full scholarship to international transfer students.</p>

<p>the other fact is that I'm majoring in business. if i graduate in europe and go on for a MBA in US, this will also involve high costs. but its value will worth a lot more than a undegrad degree.</p>

<p>so i guess, i'll return for graduate studies.</p>