Is it true that Ivy League schools offer the same education as "common" universities?

<p>Students pay for the name of the school, not a better education.
I think classes are easier in ivy league schools. I don't know anyone who gets lower than a B in all the classes, not because they do well but the profs tend to inflate the grades. My friend was a PHD grad in chemistry at Yale, and she taught a chemistry 101 lab course for the undergrad class. She was told not to give any student less than a B (unless they skipped too many classes). In general, I found the common university to be more intense and more work.
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<p>I was wondering if anyone here agrees with the statement above.</p>

<p>It depends who you ask and, more than anything else, where they go to school. I can't resolve this question, but I think it's wrong to say that ivy league schools are easy or even average. Maybe it depends on the school itself - I can speak for only 1 - but I know several people who were valedictorians and are now having trouble getting Bs.</p>

<p>Its in the numbers that the top colleges, including all 8 ivies, have smaller classes, which I think matters a lot.</p>

<p>I would say yes and no. Going to an Ivy League school will probably surround you with more intellectual people, give you access to more learned and experienced professors, and perhaps open a few more doors for you.</p>

<p>However, when you're sitting in Spanish 101, American History, and Biology, sometimes you just have to ask yourself: is it worth paying so much money to go to an Ivy League school? Spanish is spanish is spanish; the verb conjugations aren't changing from Harvard to Ole Miss. You're learning the same thing.</p>

<p>kayake, education is, in large part, what you make of it. However, in my opinion, comparing an Ivy League to a "common" university isn't accurate. Yes, there are many alternatives that are as good as the Ivy League, but none of those can be labled "common". Altogether, you can get an unbeatable undergraduate experience from 40 or so colleges and universities, including all 8 Ivy League schools.</p>

<p>Oh my god. Agreed with Alexandre. What exactly is "common" among all non-Ivy institutions?!</p>

<p>rofl Chem 101 at Yale is something like "Chemistry, Energy, and the Environment" -- soo, yes, generally gut courses don't assign really low grades, because...well, they're guts. In a class like Orgo, on the other hand, it is very possible -- and common -- to receive Cs. Other middle/high level science courses don't curve too harshly because doing so would encourage more students to "drop down" a level and take a course below their level in order to beat the curve -- and that would be ridiculous. </p>

<p>My education here is definitely different than my friends' at other schools (I'm talking about not-top-tier schools...Tufts, Emory, etc probably offer a very similar experience. But there is a difference between Yale/Dartmouth/etc vs. ASU/UMD/UF etc). It's not just the professors, etc. The courses are generally much more rigorous. I get assigned far more reading/problem sets/papers than do my friends at most other schools. The courses are difficult and intense. </p>

<p>Yes, there is grade inflation. But honestly, at a place like Yale in a higher-level class, it would be incredibly unfair to assign your "average" philosophy major a C because he/she came in the middle of an upper-level seminar. If that were the case, that would screw over Yalies' chances at admission to grad school. Professors give out Bs or As if the students do B or A work. Plenty of people here get Cs...Ds and Fs are rare, but that makes sense given that Yale only accepts people who can actually handle the coursework.</p>

<p>also, did the person writing the above statement attend both a "common university" (his words not mine) AND an ivy league school? Because if not, there's no basis for comparison of coursework. And as someone who, when she returns from break, will be faced with 1000 pages of reading, two 12-page papers (assigned one week, due 1.5 weeks later), a problem set and a foreign language exam, I kind of resent the fact that someone says that top institutions have less work lol. I'm also a freshman. And I'm not even taking the hardest courseload of those I know. So yeah, it's not exactly easy. Yes, you could get through taking all "gut" courses, but very few people do that. Grrrr. Haha sorry, I'm just a little stressed :-)</p>

<p>"Altogether, you can get an unbeatable undergraduate experience from 40 or so colleges and universities, including all 8 Ivy League schools."</p>

<p>You can get an "unbeatable undergraduate experience" at many more than 40 U.S. schools.</p>

<p>To the fresh(wo)man at Yale:</p>

<p>Your post is a bit misleading. I have absolutely no doub that your courseload (and pretty much everyone at Yale) is heavy, rigorous, and challenging. HOWEVER, you failed to note that you CAN set yourself up with an absurdly challenging and rigorous schedule at a "common" state school. The students there just have to search harder and longer for those classes. I think it is much easier for state school students to avoid those kinds of classes, while students at Yale will inevitably end up with lots of work. But please keep in mind that state school students, if they search for them, can find classes that are just as difficult and just as demanding as those at Yale.</p>

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But please keep in mind that state school students, if they search for them, can find classes that are just as difficult and just as demanding as those at Yale.

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<p>I'm sure that's true to a very limited extent. Once you get into the higher level coursework, the experience and research of the faculty member ties heavily into how rigorous, demanding, and fulfilling the course becomes. I don't think the faculty strength between Yale and any given state school is debatable.</p>

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Yes, there is grade inflation. But honestly, at a place like Yale in a higher-level class, it would be incredibly unfair to assign your "average" philosophy major a C because he/she came in the middle of an upper-level seminar. If that were the case, that would screw over Yalies' chances at admission to grad school. Professors give out Bs or As if the students do B or A work.

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<p>So because they want to go to med or law school, they should be allowed to have their grades inflated? I guess that's why people tend not to do engineering/science prior to professional school, there not nearly as much grade inflation as in other disciplines.</p>

<p>Ivies are top notch for a reason-- prolly because they have more funding and can afford better research and professors. There's simply more opportunities in such a school. So, it's not just a name to pay for.</p>

<p>Also, most college professors around the nation use curve grading, so in smaller classes it's actually wayy more competitive for those top grades.
I've never heard anyone say that Ivies profs inflate grades.</p>

<p>If one takes the time to research it, I think one would be surprised to see just how impressive (and just how MORE impressive than elite private schools) a state school's faculty can be. The recent trend (really since the 90s) is for the most learned, experienced, and recognized professors to relocate to state schools, largely because of the salary spikes, research opportunities, and other perks.</p>

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and just how MORE impressive than elite private schools) a state school's faculty can be.

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<p>I'm sorry, that's just not the case.</p>

<p>Well feel free to compare the faculty of Berkeley (an overall survey) to that of Yale. I think you'll be surprised in terms of percentages of Nobels, McCarthurs, etc.</p>

<p>Ok dude, don't use Berkeley, probably the most elite of all public schools in the country, as a comparison.</p>

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Well feel free to compare the faculty of Berkeley (an overall survey) to that of Yale. I think you'll be surprised in terms of percentages of Nobels, McCarthurs, etc.

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<p>Well that's not really fair. Berkeley is a top school. We're comparing "common" schools versus Ivy's, not Ivy vs. non-Ivy.</p>

<p>Oh indeed it is quite fair! Berkeley is a STATE school, and it is CONSIDERABLY less selective than Yale for in-state students! Funny how the tones change when we remember that Berkely is a public, state school - one for the "common" man as the OP might say!</p>

<p>To me, "common" mean average. An average student does not get into Berkeley.</p>