Mechanical Engineering?

<p>Hey guys, </p>

<p>I was just wondering how mech engineering is? I'm really weak in physics and sciences in general. But my math is very good. What this effect me?</p>

<p>Physics is really important for mechanical engineering. I'd recommend Industrial/financial engineering if you don't like the sciences but are good at math.</p>

<p>For example, <a href="http://www.ieor.columbia.edu/pages/dptoverview/index.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.ieor.columbia.edu/pages/dptoverview/index.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>I am a 3rd year Mechanical Engineer student, and you definitely have to have a solid grasp on Physics.</p>

<p>Do you think its possible to improve in physics? Like I am VERY bad at learning this type of stuff.</p>

<p>I have always believed that, for many people, the brain has to be more mature than 18 or 19 to really conceptualize and do well in physics. Unfortunately, physics is required early in the engineering curriculum. Also, the way many universities 'teach' physics is actually to 'weed out' students rather than really teach it. Tests are usually designed as multiple choice (guess) and are, in many cases, tricky. There is no partial credit, so if one step of a 6 step calculation is in error, there is no credit for the other 5 steps.</p>

<p>S's experience with physics was nearly identical to my experience 30 years ago...even to the point of using the same textbook (although a newer edition) and similar testing.</p>

<p>As a side note: When S took his initial physics courses with the Physics Department he struggled to get a 'low B'. However, he had relatively less difficulty when he took similar required courses in the Mechanics department (statics, dynamics, etc). He also postponed his last physics course (it was not a prerequisite for any of his ME courses) until his last semester and was able to get an 'A' without much difficulty.</p>