Moving in High School

<p>What do you think about moving in high school? I'm going to move to a high school in another state, and I need some suggestions/ideas. The social/emotional problems with moving, I can cope with, but the academic problems worry me greatly: What if I don't a bunch of my credits don't get transferred? What if my transcript, grades, etc don't make it? What if the differences in the schools grading scale and GPA scale affect my grades dramatically? What if there's requirements in the new schools that I must fulfill, causing me to stay back (or something of the sort)? Is there anything else that I should pay attention to? I mean, obviously, I will get appointment(s) with the guidance counselors in the new school and the school I'm going to right now... but does anybody have some advice or can anybody assauge my fears?</p>

<p>What grade are you in? I'm a junior and I just moved ~600 miles. I think I got pretty screwed over with the move (I know that's not what you wanted to hear). I was in the top 5 at my old school with a ton of ecs and community service and now there's like absolutely nothing to do at my new school, grades are unweighted, and students are unranked. </p>

<p>Credits you won't have a problem with. I mean, if you've taken Biology honors, they can't make you take it again, right? And I don't think you'll have a problem with grading either. I doubt they'd turn your As into Bs. I used the 4.33 (5.33 weighted) scale in my old school and here they use the 100 pt scale, so they converted an A to a 95 and A+ to 98, so my GPA is still pretty high.</p>

<p>And the school also requires a computer class and another gym class for graduation... but there's no way in hell that I'm doing that. My counselor said he might be able to pull some strings. We'll see.</p>

<p>Did you look up the new school yet? You can read a lot about guidance policies, classes, etc on the website.</p>

<p>I don't think you'll have too many problems... and even if you do, you can always milk it on your college essay. Hope this helps!</p>

<p>*What do you think about moving in high school? I'm going to move to a high school in another state, and I need some suggestions/ideas. *</p>

<p>I'm in the same situation you are right now. For 2 years I went to a high school in San Diego, and now in the summer before my Junior year I moved to Hawaii. </p>

<p>*What if my transcript, grades, etc don't make it? *</p>

<p>Your new school can always get in touch with your old school and get all the information on you.</p>

<p>*What if the differences in the schools grading scale and GPA scale affect my grades dramatically? *</p>

<p>It won't. </p>

<p>*What if there's requirements in the new schools that I must fulfill, causing me to stay back (or something of the sort)? *</p>

<p>I'm actually also in this position unfortunately. I'm required to take "Modern History of Hawaii", "Participation in Democracy", and "Career and Life Planning," 2 semester long Freshman History courses and a guidance course. Luckily, they allowed my "AP Euro" class from last year to count as my PiD class. Unfortunately, I HAVE to take the other two, but luckily they're gonna allow me to take them online.</p>

<p>If you do end up having to take a class that is dumb like that, ask if you can test out of it. I asked and they wouldn't let me, but maybe your school will be different.</p>

<p>*Is there anything else that I should pay attention to? *</p>

<p>Make sure you keep up with college prep stuff. For example, don't get so caught up with trying to make friends that you miss sign up dates for things like the PSAT, SAT, etc... Just because you move doesn't mean you can "forget" about getting into a college.</p>

<p>* does anybody have some advice or can anybody assauge my fears?*</p>

<p>Don't worry about it so much. I'm a Navy kid so I've moved over 10 times in my life, and I've gone to over 10 schools. Moving really isn't that big of a deal. Yeah you're gonna have a crap social life for a bit but after a month, or maybe 6 months depending on your personality, you're gonna have a tight group of friends and you won't be missing your old friends. Well maybe, for example I still AIM with my friends from SoCal.</p>

<p>Also remember to get involved in extracurriculars! Try and get on that asap. It will not only help with college apps, but you'll also meet new people and make some friends. Try new things you're not comfortable with, see how it goes =] Moving is the time when you can "change" your personality in a sense. If you were the shy kid at your old school, you can try and be more outgoing and this school and no one would be any wiser.</p>

<p>Don't worry so much about the social aspect of the move, make sure you keep up your grades. Like I said before, you won't get any leeway in admissions just because you move (well maybe a tad but don't let your grades plummet). </p>

<p>Moving can also turn out to be a great thing admission wise depending on where you're moving also. For example, in my competitive SoCal school I was ranked around 30/260. However, after a Quarter of school here I'm the valedictorian of the Junior class as of now. A valedictorian will be a nice little hook for me when I apply to colleges.</p>

<p>Don't worry! Moving isn't the end of the world. You're gonna end up moving when you go to college anyway =] GL</p>

<p>How are you liking Hawaii =] (what school do you go to?)</p>

<p>
[quote]
I'm actually also in this position unfortunately. I'm required to take "Modern History of Hawaii", "Participation in Democracy", and "Career and Life Planning," 2 semester long Freshman History courses and a guidance course

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yea it really blows, Modern Hawaiian History in particular (Hawaiian history is excruciatingly boring), luckily we have free e-school but the class filled up real fast and here I am in my junior year stuck taking a useless class =/</p>

<p>I go to Radford, yea its terrible but w/e I'm valedictorian.</p>

<p>tbh, I don't really like Hawaii. I've lived in Washington State, Virginia, and San Diego (was born in Italy, but only lived there for like 4 months). I really LOVED all 3 places especially San Diego. My family had a brand new million dollar house in a brand new neighborhood like 5 miles from the beach, I was in the best educational district in the region, I went to one of the best schools, and I was a member of one of the top Marching and Concert High School bands in the nation. I really had it good in Socal =[</p>

<p>One of my friends switched high schools, and it was really cool for her, because she told the counselor that she already took a lot of the required classes (P.E., health, computers, etc.) even though she didn't, so she never had to waste her time on those.</p>

<p>I'm considered to be in the top ten in my grade at the school I'm currently going to right now. I did some research on the new school that I'm going to, and this school was literally one of the most competitive schools in the nation. It's going to be hard to bring myself up.</p>

<p>I'm actually kind of excited to move, but still, I'm extremely scared. I've moved tons of times before, but it was all pretty much in elementary schools, when things didn't matter as much. So, I know what it feels like to say good-bye to friends, make new friends, and getting adjusted to the new place in general. It's just the whole concept of HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS/GRADES/TRANSCRIPT stuff that's freaking me out. I'm just glad I'm not moving in my senior year... I'm a sophomore right now.</p>

<p>I moved ~350 miles the summer before my junior year to another state.</p>

<p>1) Since you're the top ten in your current school, you must be fairly intelligent. You will work harder for the same grades, but that's life. </p>

<p>2) Best tip I can give you - throw yourself into your new school. Start joining every club that interests you when you first get there - sports, the newspaper/yearbook, debate, whatever. As you gradually flesh out your interests, drop clubs. You should be left with a core group of clubs that you enjoy participating in, and that's where you can find your friends. Of course, in class, if you're not too shy, you can also organize a study group or something. People are always willing to get together to study with someone else. </p>

<p>3) The only conceivable problem lies in graduation requirements. But, assuming you're moving over the summer, ask your guidance counselor right when you get there, if you can either take summer school or the courses online. This will help you tremendously when it comes to choosing your senior year classes.</p>

<p>PM me if you have more questions.</p>

<p>Moving pretty much defined my whole high school experience, for better and worse. I went to 3 different high schools in 3 different states. We moved at the end of my junior year from Minneapolis to Grand Rapids, Michigan so I understand how hard it is to move at that point. Luckily since my old school in MN was on trimesters and my new school in Michigan was on semesters I got to graduate early. Looking back that was a mixed bag too. </p>

<p>Now I write a lot about issues related to moving on my blog (Welcome</a> to New Kid Central!). Check it out and leave a post if you like. I'd love to hear about your experience and if you know of any books, sites, articles that might help kids in the same situation, please share.</p>

<p>(Full disclosure - I'm the author of a book: 10 Dos & Don'ts When You're The New Kid: A survival guide for teens. It's more about the social/emotional parts of moving, but check it out on Amazon if you're interested.) </p>

<p>Good luck.</p>

<p>My semblance of a social life was shot to hell when I moved before my junior year. Don't get me wrong, I used to solidly be in the middle of the pack when it came to GPA and now am in the top 5% (IB transition to trad), so the move was a good strategy academically. But I moved from a myopic Southern community to a liberal yet closed-off Californian town. I really didn't understand the social hierarchy for a long time; looks and personality will get you so far because this popularity/friends algorithm is complex.
The feeling I got was apathy. I mean, this is a place where you've known your friends since y'all were in diapers and your parents went to college together. It's close-knit, sometimes xenophobic (not in the literal sense; we're diverse). I tried for the first two months to become friends with people but that didn't turn out as successful as I'd planned. I basically stomped on my chances and became apathetic right back. I used to be the MPDG at my old school. Here I'm as exuberant and full of life as a soggy graham cracker.
I mean, it's junior year. It's crunch time. I have a year left before I can hopefully never ever see these people again and run another social race in college, this time on even footing. And if I try to spend this time trying to keep up socially, I'll just be going to the same community college as them.</p>