Question my permanent residence!

<p>I am 18 years of age, and I have lived in U.S. for 7 years. I also go to a public school here for approx 7 years. Parents applied for AOS in October '06, but they haven't heard anything since. Considering that my family holds a non-citizenship status, how eligible am I to apply for financial aid and other scholarships for non-international students?</p>

<p>Thanks for the input.</p>

<p>As long as you are not classified as a permanent resident, you are considered an international student and are not able to apply for federal financial aid. Very few colleges award institutional aid to international students.</p>

<p>I am not sure at which point in the AOS process you would become eligible for financial aid, but my college told me that they cannot give me any fin aid before physically seeing my permanent resident card.</p>

<p>Please be aware that as long as you are not a permanent resident, you cannot establish residency in your state and thus you would have to pay out-of-state tuition at your in-state public universities.</p>

<p>"Please be aware that as long as you are not a permanent resident, you cannot establish residency in your state and thus you would have to pay out-of-state tuition at your in-state public universities."</p>

<p>Check this out very carefully with your public in-state universities, and with your public in-state community colleges. In the past, some were willing to give in-state status for tuition purposes based on years attending public schools. But even with that, you still wouldn't be eligible for any federally funded financial aid.</p>

<p>"Please be aware that as long as you are not a permanent resident, you cannot establish residency in your state and thus you would have to pay out-of-state tuition at your in-state public universities."</p>

<p>The above statement is not completely correct. I know at least one state university system - the University of Minnesota - that grants you in-state tuition rate if you have already received receipt for your I-485 AOS.</p>

<p>I was in your situation when I applied for colleges. To answer your original question. You cannot apply for financial aid and other scholarships for non-international students most of the time. Be aware that there are colleges that are need-blind towards international students: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, MIT, Williams, Amherst, and Middlebury. Best of luck to you.</p>

<p>I am aware that a few states make exceptions when it comes to in-state tuition status (California grants in-state tuition status if a student has attended a public high school for three years, for example). I made the assumption that the OP currently lives in NC, which does not make exceptions like that to the best of my knowledge. But definitely follow up on the other suggestions. I am sorry if I jumped to a premature conclusion. Thanks for correcting me, IPBear and happymomof1.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.collegeboard.com/about/association/international/pdf/sr_NC01.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.collegeboard.com/about/association/international/pdf/sr_NC01.pdf&lt;/a>
North</a> Carolina in-state tuition status
Undergraduate</a> Admissions</p>

<p>The one thing I forgot about: if you happen to be on a H-4 visa, you might be able to establish residence.</p>

<p>Here's the situation: my dad's lawyer said that the chance for my family of obtaining a permanent resident status (North Carolina in this case) is high. Until we get a letter of approval, my father's status is under F1 and my status would be under F2. Last time I checked, the processing time is around 1-3 years. It has been almost 2 years since my dad applied for AOS. </p>

<p>The three top colleges I'm pondering are outside of state: UCB, UCSC, and UCLA. Am I eligible for any of the scholarships offered at these colleges?</p>

<p>If you don't get your permanent resident visa by the time you start college, you would have to apply for an F-1 visa, wouldn't you?</p>

<p>Anyway, I am afraid you would not qualify for need-based financial aid at the UCs w/o a green card. They might consider you for their merit awards, but those are extremely competitve.</p>

<p>
[quote]
my dad's lawyer said that the chance for my family of obtaining a permanent resident status (North Carolina in this case) is high

[/quote]

After re-reading this I need some clarification: are your chances of attaining a permanent resident visa (green card) high, or are your chances of becoming a resident of NC (=> in-state tuition at NC public colleges) high? I was assuming the former because F-1/F-2 visa holders can never establish residency in a state, but your post sounds like the latter.</p>

<p>No, the chance of getting the permanent resident card is high. I assume my dad is more than qualified.</p>

<p>"If you don't get your permanent resident visa by the time you start college, you would have to apply for an F-1 visa, wouldn't you?"</p>

<p>Not necessarily. This depends on the current immigration status of the prospective student. The problem of course is managing to pay for it!</p>

<p>He doesn't need F-1.</p>

<p>IPBear, you confused me. Are there any special rules for students in the AOS process? Of course the OP doesn't need a student visa if he (?) becomes a permanent resident. But if he didn't get his permanent resident visa before college starts, wouldn't he have to apply for a F-1 visa (considering that he's on F-2 right now)? Not that it would matter... (hopefully!)</p>

<p>Anyway, I guess the bottom line is that you don't qualify for financial aid at the UCs until you are permanent resident.</p>

<p>b@r!um -</p>

<p>I just found this link about the necessity for converting an F-2 to F-1 in order to pursue post-secondary studies:
F-2</a> Visa Restrictions Lawyers & Legal Information</p>

<p>J-2 visa holders are allowed to study either full or part-time without changing their status:
J2</a> Visa, J2 Dependent Visa, Visa for J-1 Family Members, J-2 Visa Holders, US Dependents Visas</p>

<p>I'm still hunting for the information on H and G visas!</p>

<p>OK guys, I'm quitting the research because my brain has frozen up from trying to make sense of the USCIS website. Here is more stuff I've found out:</p>

<p>Students with TPS (Temporary Protected Status) can be eligible for in-state tuition depending on the state of residence. </p>

<p>Students with an H-4 don't need to change visa status in order to study in the US, but they aren't eligible for work authorizations like holders of F-1, M-1, and J-1 visas.</p>

<p>And there are waaaaay more visa categories out there than I had thought there were!</p>

<p>"Students with an H-4 don't need to change visa status in order to study in the US, but they aren't eligible for work authorizations like holders of F-1, M-1, and J-1 visas."</p>

<p>That's not entirely true either. I had an H-4 visa before I applied to colleges, and I received a work permit (had to pay 100-something dollars for it), so I could work legally in the US.</p>

<p>But to address the OP, it is always more difficult for international students to get financial aid, whether it's in terms of merit scholarships at public schools, or need-based aid at private institutions (except for the ones IPBear listed). I got lucky and received my green card two weeks before sending out apps. I sincerely hope the same happens to you. If not, I recommend researching online to find some schools in your area who are more generous with financial aid for international students. These will usually be small, liberal arts colleges - maybe not the best ones academically, but certainly not your worst picks</p>

<p>Questioning your permanent residence would require you to have it in the first place.</p>

<p>Even if you become a permanent resident, the UCs do not give good FA for out of state students. With an exceptionally low EFC, you would probably just get the Pell Grant and a ton of loans. The UCs are not a good choice for OOS if aid is needed -- even with a green card -- so I would make some adjustments to your list.</p>