Tipping Movers?

<p>A friend is moving to our area from another state, and told me he plans to tip the moving guys $400. He has a large apartment's worth of stuff. Apparently he already tipped the guys from this company $400 after they packed and removed his stuff from his 3rd floor walkup apartment on the other end. (It went into storage.) I gather that there were 5 guys in the initial crew. The place he is going into is on two floors: 2nd and 3rd.</p>

<p>It sounds as if this crew could be the same guys, although I doubt that they will send as many up here. Does this sound reasonable or excessive to you?</p>

<p>My friend's income is currently very tight...</p>

<p>Is that $400 each? If so, it's way excessive, IMO. If that's the amount to be split between them all, it's in line with what H tipped our movers this past summer -- but we had an entire house full of stuff. Our move was pack up one day, deliver/unload the next. H tipped at the end of day 2. Are you in a "high price" part of the country? If not, it may be a little excessive for an apartment. (Again, just my opinion.)</p>

<p>If they have a good attitude and go out of their way to do a good job, I will tip delivery people and movers. If they have the "this job would be great if it weren't for the customers" attitude, and are sullen and won't go out of their way? I won't tip them much of anything. Probably the best tip he gave was the one before they moved him. imo</p>

<p>It was $400 for the group, and it was in a high cost area. This area is NOT high cost, but of course the moving guys will be coming from the original locale.</p>

<p>Part of the picture to me is that my friend's income is strictly social security at the moment. I really don't think that it is reasonable for him to give the moving company guys a quarter of his monthly income two months in a row, when they have already been paid to do the job. Maybe I'm just cheap. :D</p>

<p>I used to be a bigger tipper than I am now. Someone has to impress me, these days, to get a really great tip. If they phone it in? Forget it.</p>

<p>Did your friend ever work for tips? People who worked for tips tend to tip more.</p>

<p>I tipped 3 guys $40 each for 5 hours of worth. I thought that was fair, but what do I know..</p>

<p>My folks tipped about the same for 7 hours of work...buy these guys made less per hour...</p>

<p>One of the movers told me that they moved somebody into a 60 million dollar house....they were moving 2,000 wine bottles etc....and the tip was zero....</p>

<p>I don't think he ever worked for tips. He's just a very generous person. :)</p>

<p>How much is the move costing him?</p>

<p>A friend is helping with most of it. He did pay $800 for a truck to move a lot of his stuff up to my house temporarily--other friends helped with that--plus the $400 tip. So if he tips another $400, it will have cost him at least $1600. A month's income. Plus the thousands the friend is paying the moving company.</p>

<p>One thing that must be said is that he obviously has a lot of very devoted friends. It speaks to the kind of guy he is. :)</p>

<p>Yikes. That sounds excessive. A quick google search gave a variety of tipping scenerios.</p>

<p>The one thing you should not take into account is total cost of the job as you don't need to tip for longer distance driving time. </p>

<p>I think $5 an hour worked per mover is more than fair. But then I can be pretty tight......</p>

<p>I think sax is right...</p>

<p>It has never even dawned on me or my wife to tip a mover, but we will certainly consider doing so the next time we move.</p>

<p>Oh please tip your movers. Can you tell that S-2 worked several summers, and briefly post-graduation, as an in-city mover? He did. When their hard-working crew was tipped zero, or like pizza delivery men, after an all-day job, it was mighty demoralizing. I told him that some folks didn't know to tip a mover. He was incredulous. "Everybody knows.." </p>

<p>His foreman always dropped mention, diplomatically, of tipping the crew to the customer (something like:"when you tip, I'll handle it and distribute it to my men"). That's because some people honestly didn't know. And yet, some ignored the comment.</p>

<p>It is absolutely anticipated by the moving company and accounts in part for lower salary, along the same logic as restauranteurs who pay food-servers sub-minimum wage, expecting the community to make up for that. </p>

<p>
[quote]
The one thing you should not take into account is total cost of the job as you don't need to tip for longer distance driving time.

[/quote]
Sore point in that moving company. They didn't pay the movers for time spent driving on the truck, only the truck driver among them who got a bump. In L.A. traffic, "truck time" can be a big chunk of unpaid time, during which that worker can't make any other money.</p>

<p>It never occurred to me to tip movers either. Delivery people, sometimes, depending on item and service level. No one ever dropped a hint either. I did provide cold drinks on hot days and snacks when feasible.</p>

<p>Our last move, I remember they arrived at 7:30, and I had to be at 8 at the bank to get a cashiers check because they wouldn't start until I handed over a check. This was a full house move from one nice house to another nicer house about 4 hours away. I know that wasn't the moving guys rule, but it annoyed me tremendously. I knew I had to pay before they started moving things in, but no one said it had to be a cashiers check until they got there and I pulled out my checkbook. Fortunately, we had money in the local bank sufficient to cover it, because with no warning that might have been tricky in a new town.</p>

<p>
[quote]
It is absolutely anticipated by the moving company and accounts in part for lower salary, along the same logic as restauranteurs who pay food-servers sub-minimum wage, expecting the community to make up for that. Sore point in that moving company.</p>

<p>They didn't pay the movers for time spent driving on the truck, only the truck driver among them who got a bump. In L.A. traffic, "truck time" can be a big chunk of unpaid time, during which that worker can't make any other money.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>So that company is ripping off its workers, probably in order to underbid and get the job, then expects the unsuspecting client to make up the difference, in untaxed income, of course. Nice. </p>

<p>This is an example of why I really, really hate tipping as a custom.</p>

<p>Since the guys will be driving 6 hours each way in this case, I highly doubt that it will be unpaid time. My friend just told me that the contract states that there will be five guys again. I have a lot more stuff than he does, and when our stuff was moved here from storage I think there were about 3 guys. That was definitely the number sent down to CT by the moving company to pack and load all of our stuff. (Packing alone took two days.)</p>

<p>We moved out of our house six months ago (five minutes away!) while a reno was taking place and will be moving back in a few weeks. There were four men who loaded and moved, then unloaded about 6,000 sq. ft of furniture and boxes. The men who packed were different individuals and they were tipped the previous day when they spent 7 hours packing. The move itself took from 8 a.m. to about 6:30 p.m. We've requested the same crew because they were great. They worked incredibly hard, were very careful with our belongings, and went above and beyond on a few issues. We tipped them $100 each and plan to do so again.</p>

<p>Consolation, depending on how long it takes your friend's things to be moved in, I think for an apartment sized move, and considering what he's already tipped them, giving $50/each is probably sufficient.</p>

<p>I usually tip $40 each for about 3 person so that works out to be $120. It should be tipped both ways, to and from. I have a baby grand piano that takes a lot of care in packing and unpacking. The rest of the stuff, I don't really care that much.</p>

<p>
[quote]
His foreman always dropped mention, diplomatically, of tipping the crew to the customer (something like:"when you tip, I'll handle it and distribute it to my men"). That's because some people honestly didn't know. And yet, some ignored the comment.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Tipping should not be a requirement. It should never be suggested by somebody providing a service. The customer is already paying for the service.</p>

<p>
[quote]

It is absolutely anticipated by the moving company and accounts in part for lower salary, along the same logic as restauranteurs who pay food-servers sub-minimum wage, expecting the community to make up for that.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>And the customer is anticipating that the company is doing its job and paying its employees!</p>

<p>I didn't make these rules and customs, but believe if I live in a situation I need to hold up my end of the social compact.</p>

<p>Here's a look at an industry we patronize more frequently: restaurants. In the U.S. it's understood that tips to food servers are optional at restaurants. In Paris, the gratuity is already added on to the bill as a percentage of the total. American restaurants hope that customer-crafted tips will incentivize (ugh) food service employees to provide the best possible customer service. (Tips = "to insure prompt service"). </p>

<p>Taking that idea into the moving industry, would you rather pay higher job estimates to moving companies (to cover higher labor costs)? OK, then all do that. The movers would then be carrying your glassware and pianos around tight stairwells of the house you want to sell, and with no monetary incentive to be extra careful and courteous. You don't want people to dial in their jobs, so what DO you want here?! Gentlemen movers with exquisite manners, sobriety, large muscles and quick feet who love to move your stuff with utmost care so their company boss will profit? It's not going to happen @ $10/hour. </p>

<p>Really all a low-salaried moving man has to hope for is a decent tip at the end of the day. Based on that hope they're working at lower wages than their buddies in other industries, and giving you good service. If you know this and still don't tip, you're not holding up your end of the societal compact within this particular industry.</p>

<p>So you mean that these people don't give a $$$$$$ about how they do the job? They do it "well" just for a pay off? Maybe they should worry about doing their job well so they can keep it!</p>