Too much sushi??

<p>My favorite takeout sushi place recently opened a store in my building. I have gone from having sushi once a week to at least 4 times a week. I know there are some warnings about too much tuna and salmon. Are four lunches a week too many? My usuals are the raw tuna and salmon.</p>

<p>I've read the recommendations for tuna are: one serving a week for light tuna, or once a month for albacore tuna which is a bigger fish thus has more mercury per serving. (A serving of 4-6 oz.)</p>

<p>For a pregnant woman, the guidelines are much more stringent.</p>

<p>The primary issue with the quantity you eat is the concentration of metals in large fish, such as mercury. Another general problem with sushi that isn't so directly related to the amount you eat is parasites. Be sure you are eating the highest quality fish and always chew it thoroughly.</p>

<p>Do they have any vegetarian options? It might not hurt to take a break from the raw fish for a day or two a week.</p>

<p>4 times per week...wow...too much tuna. There's lots of mercury in tuna...I wouldn't go more than once per week. Salmon is OK as long as you are getting it from a high quality provider (the parasite risk from raw fish is real...I have a family member who was affected). There's some terrific veggie sushi like avocado and cucumber rolls. The place I go to has shibake mushroom rolls..delicious. (spelled this mushroom wrong on purpose cause it gets blocked with the real spelling!) </p>

<p>One other possible concern is salt. Only if you have blood pressure. For me though, it makes me retain water and thus gain weight - yuk...so I go easy on it.</p>

<p>OK, less tuna, more salmon and other things.</p>

<p>I had a contract once where they had good sushi in the cafeteria. I ate sushi almost every day for 6 months. Lost about 10 lbs! Not sure about the other risks involved, but that was a good thing.</p>

<p>I like how I don't get that after lunch slump when I have it. Many days I forget to get my 3 pm Starbucks. As usual moderation may be the key. Right now it's easy, new and tasty.</p>

<p>
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My favorite takeout sushi place recently opened a store in my building.

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<p>So, are the rents reasonable there in Heaven? :)</p>

<p>lol, think about it this way. Some japanese eat much more then that a week.</p>

<p>Tamago (egg) and kani-kami (imitation crab) are both low-mercury protein options for sushi. Kani-kami is usually made from pollock. Futo-maki is delicious and often includes both.</p>

<p>They're also cooked, if you're worried about the safety thing. I'm pretty picky about where I eat raw fish.</p>

<p>Our building (no I don't own it--it's 1 million SF and 40 odd stories) has rents around $20 NNN for retail--it's been hard to keep them filled. Office rents are more in the $30 range and up. We have several Starbucks, a nice Italian full service restaurant, some stores, a bank, and several fast service restaurants--Jimmy Johns, Soup, Sushi, etc. It's nice not to have to go out for lunch in the dreary winter months. </p>

<p>I once went to a building where they made artificial krab as they call it here. Can't get that smell out of my mind so no Krab for me. Generally our raw sushi here is very good quality and right off the boats.</p>

<p>Sushi is mostly rice. The actual amount of fish in a typical serving would be considerably less than four ounces, I think. </p>

<p>My main concern would be the possible presence of parasites in raw fish. I eat sushi, but I stick with the cooked or vegetable options.</p>

<p>I doubt you could eat enough raw tuna salmon in sushi or sashimi to warrant fear of mercury poisoning unless you break the bank. If you are sure the restaurant uses high quality fish and stores them at the appropriate temperature,just eat away, no worries. Please don't bag any leftover raw fish to take home if you can't keep it refrigerated at all times.</p>

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kani-kami (imitation crab)

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<p>In some places you will have to ask for surimi. It's the same thing.</p>

<p>cbreeze...hmmm...I'm not sure how you would know how much mercury is in the tuna. Better to be safe and limit how much you're eating...but that's just me.
<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/23/dining/23sushi.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/23/dining/23sushi.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>I like unagi/eel
NRDC:</a> Mercury Contamination in Fish - Guide to Mercury in Sushi
my favorite thing @ the sushi place is green tea mochi ice cream :)</p>

<p>Are you eating rolls? If so, I highly doubt you are getting a "full serving" of tuna each time you eat sushi. You are eating more rice, and other "filler." 4 oz of tuna can make A LOT of sushi rolls. Now if you are eating large pieces of sashimi, you could get up to 4oz much quicker.</p>

<p>Another point here is that the official mercury-in-fish warnings are for pregnant women, nursing mothers, women who might become pregnant, and young children.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/Product-SpecificInformation/Seafood/FoodbornePathogensContaminants/Methylmercury/ucm115662.htm%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/Product-SpecificInformation/Seafood/FoodbornePathogensContaminants/Methylmercury/ucm115662.htm&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>The people who post on the Parents Forum typically do not fit into any of those categories. Most of us completed our families long ago -- that's why we're on a forum for parents of college students and applicants. And quite a few of us are men. The limits don't apply to us, and the whole mercury issue is of less concern to us than it is for our daughters.</p>

<p>Actually, I know a man who contracted mercury poisoning from eating too much sushi. The diagnosis took months, and he was quite ill.</p>