What do you think about teachers teaching students how to deal with police?

<p>This article and concerning event troubled me.
Two</a> Norfolk teachers put on leave over material about police | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com</p>

<p>Why should teachers be punished for teaching students their constitutional rights?</p>

<p>^ Ehhh... it wasn't because the video was teaching them how to protect their constitutional rights. It was more about pushing the pro-pot agenda. I understand why a parent would complain and why it was controversial. </p>

<p>[Disclaimer: I am 100% pro-pot legalization. But you can't really distribute a video that basically shows kids how to break the law.]</p>

<p>I don't understand why people think its pro-pot. If the police use unauthorized search measures, all convictions must be null and void or it open the door for the police to be more intrusive in the future. People need to understand their constitutional rights and they need to exercise them for any purpose.</p>

<p>Just because a pro-pot group made the documents and videos doesnt mean the educational value is any less powerful.</p>

<p>^ Did you read it? It basically said that it taught the kids how to get away with having pot. That was the message it gave.</p>

<p>Where? I didn't catch that message.</p>

<p>So you'd rather kids be uneducated about their constitutional rights and allow the police to have unhindered control over them?</p>

<p>If we don't know our rights than we might as well not have any rights. I think this will get a lot of kids talking in class... The definition of a good lesson.</p>

<p>[Disclaimer: I watched the video before making any comment and I don't think it shows kids how to break the law]</p>

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So you'd rather kids be uneducated about their constitutional rights and allow the police to have unhindered control over them?

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</p>

<p>Nobody in this thread said or implied this, nor is this an accurate representation of anyone's stated position on this topic. </p>

<p>I read the pamphlet, but the video is 45 minutes long, so I won't be commenting on that. The pamphlet describes how to remain legally non-compliant (or more accurately, how to refrain from incriminating yourself). It emphasizes the public's right to exercise the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments and describes what the police can and cannot do (I haven't checked the absolute veracity of these statements) in certain specific situations. It makes no explicit mention of what to do when in the possession of illicit substances or when in illegal or unlawful possession of items and weapons, although it does state that one need not consent to an officer's request for a search. </p>

<p>If being in possession of pot is illegal, then this pamphlet does not condone the act in that it explicitly describes how to properly hide or dispose of the illicit substance. It does, however, state that you have no legal obligation to comply with a formal search, and encourages that you exercise your right to refrain from complying.</p>

<p>Yeah, I don't think I'd ever use the advice presented in a real-life situation. While the information presented is useful for knowledge's sake, I only exercise my rights when I deem it expedient. If I have nothing to hide, I don't really care what the cops find in my car, unless they put me in a situation detrimental to my happiness.</p>

<p>
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Where? I didn't catch that message.

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</p>

<p>From the article: </p>

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"She came home recently and said, 'You won't believe what we are learning in Government. They are teaching us how to hide our drugs,' " the parent recounted.

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<p>There must have been something that gave her that idea. Whether it was or it wasn't, that WAS the reason that the teachers got suspended.</p>

<p>
[quote]
So you'd rather kids be uneducated about their constitutional rights and allow the police to have unhindered control over them?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>So uhm... show me where I said that?</p>

<p>If teaching students their constitutional rights is the goal, they could have gone about it in a much better way. I don't think any disciplinary action is necessary, that seems excessive. I think they should be forced to find some other way to teach the lesson next time, but it doesn't seem like that big of a deal.</p>

<p>Now, the video is 45 minutes long. I'm not going to watch it. But I see nothing wrong with this: <a href="http://www.monkeyjunk.org/images/master/MainGallerys/public_m/designpics_m/graphics_m/when_dealing_with_police.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.monkeyjunk.org/images/master/MainGallerys/public_m/designpics_m/graphics_m/when_dealing_with_police.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>^ I see nothing wrong with that either. Although, they may go a bit far in the last line of the page that assumes that many police will ignore your rights. People already are very distrustful of police, and I don't think we need to play further into that paranoia and cause an even greater divide between cops and public :/</p>

<p>Pamphlet seems like basic info tbh :/</p>

<p>Didn't watch the video though.</p>